Search:
 
 

Triberr – A Quick Guide

So what is this Triberr people keep talking about? How does it work, and, more importantly, do I have to dress in animal pelts and coif my hair with chicken bones if I join?

Let’s break down Triberr into easy digestible chunks, shall we.

First, what exactly is Triberr? In short, Triberr is a reach multiplier. Huh? What does that mean? Triberr is a community of bloggers who also double has pimps, or marketing tools. These bloggers band together in tribes and share blog posts. When one tribe member posts a blog, the blog is tweeted through Twitter by all the other tribe members.

What is a tribe? No, it’s not drinking the Kool-aid. Tribes are collaborative groups of bloggers that often have a commonality. In our case, that might be writers and reviewers. Groups might consist of cliques for a more narrow target market, such as authors who write historical, erotica, thriller, etc. Tribe mates in these classification specific units share quality, relevant content and networking, and often provide guest posting opportunities.

How does it work? Triberr easily manages this through the RSS feeds (every blog had one). Triberr automagically imports blog posts into the tribal stream (much like a Twitter stream or Facebook wall) which is shared by all tribe mates. Tribe mates then share these posts with their Twitter followers, either manually or automatically.

I’ll give you an example. Say I write a fascinating post on Caribbean pirates. For simplicity’s sake, let’s assume I have 10 tribe mates. My one post is tweeted 10 times. Now think about how many Twitter followers each of my mates might have. Also think about how many people integrate their Twitter accounts with other social media networks like Facebook. The number of possible exposure grows exponentially. And what if you belong to more than one tribe? Whoa! Now that’s driving traffic to your site.

*Image provided by Getty*

Let’s one-up that. Every tribe mate can reblog your post. Reblogging through Triberr offers extra incentives. Let’s go back to my pirate post. Tribe mate Johnny thinks my post is pretty awesome. He reblogs it on his blog, putting my article in front of a new audience. Any comments made to the post on Johnny’s blog will show up on mine as well. And if tribe mate Orlando also reblogs  my post to his site, any comments made there will appear on both mine and Johnny’s blog.  In other words there is no loss of engagement.  This is good for all involved. It’s like guest posting. Less work and more interactions. Wow. I’m all over that!

Triberr is a community of engagement, and it’s growing. There are forums called bonfires for tribe members to ask questions, get tech support, network, and more.

Tribe members also collect bones. No Triberr is not conducting secret cannibalistic rituals. Bones are the equivalent to currency. Bones are earned through activity on the site and they are spent on benefits to bloggers and to creating more tribes.

But why use Triberr? Here’s the important part. When invited to join Triberr, you become a part of an instant community. Not only are you connecting with like-minded bloggers, you are expanding your potential readership sweep. It’s share and share alike. Your post gets distributed. Tribe mates are sharing good relevant content to their followers. And followers are exposed to you. Your blog traffic grows. For authors, pffsh, it’s a no brainer.

Triberr is always improving, too. Soon the network will be integrating social media sites like Facebook and Pinterest. Can you just imagine the potential reach? Get your ooga mooga primitive groove on and check it out.

Triberr.com/

 

29 responses to “Triberr – A Quick Guide”

  1. Hmm, the tribe has spoken! Jenn, I must be a complete philistine — I hadn’t heard of Triberr before. Thanks for introducing me to it. Off now to check it out…

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      No, you are not a philistine, Vanessa…well, at least I don’t think you are. LOL! Perhaps Triberr just hasn’t made it down under yet. If you blog, it will be worth checking out.

      Jenn!

      0
  2. Hope Ramsay says:

    Jenn,

    Thanks for this I’ve been seeing stuff on tribes for a few weeks now and figuring this stuff out is on my to-do list. I’ve figured out Pinterest, on to the next new thing. . .

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      There is so much more to Triberr, but I hope these basic tips will help you navigate, Hope. It really is a great tool.

      BTW – LOVE Pinterest. Just did a blog on that yesterday – which, of course, went out to my tribe mates. 😉

      Jenn!

      0
  3. I’m like Vanessa. I’d never heard about it either. Thanks for letting us know.

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      The social platform is catching on. If you were to look at tribe leaders looking for new members, you’d be amazed. And many of them are writers, Beth. It really is a cool community.

      Jenn!

      0
  4. Elisa Beatty says:

    Wow…I hadn’t heard of it either!!

    This sounds like a great new tool…though I’m not even on Twitter yet!!

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      A got a little secret, Elisa. The only time I am on Twitter is to promote my friends. However, because I’m a member of a tribe, it looks like I’m on Twitter all day long. LOL. I can’t wait for Dino and Dan (the creators of Triberr) to integrate Facebook. So much great blogs promos. (tee hee)

      Jenn!

      0
  5. I’ve heard of the “tribe” concept in the biz world and recognize its value. Was it Martha Beck or some other life coach who stumps on the importance of The Tribe? Anyway…didn’t know this type of on-line community existed and could be tapped by writers. So many gadgets in our writer/promo tool box. Thanks, Jenn!

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      You’re right, Shelley. These days writers have so many great tools in our arsenals to help promote ourselves. Communities like Triberr are like our own street teams, if you think about it. We put out quality content (like here on the Ruby blog) and our tribe mates help drive traffic to our site. It’s good for the sisterhood and for each of us individually. What’s not to like? 🙂

      Jenn!

      0
  6. I joined Triberr a while back and couldn’t figure out how to use it. It’s not, or at least it wasn’t, very intuitive for technological and social media challenged people like me. I don’t blog regularly–only once every few weeks–so I’m not sure anyone would want me in their tribe, which I haven’t any idea how to find.

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      Laurie, Triberr is constantly improving. So whatever challenges you might have had in the beginning might not be hurdles any longer. And you can always find a tribe that suits your needs and level of activity by looking through or posting to the bonfires.

      And I’d always welcome you to my tribe, sista!

      Jenn!

      0
  7. This is an interesting idea. I’ve heard of it before, but never really investigated it, because like Laurie, I don’t blog all that much and don’t feel very *influential*. 🙂 This is a great breakdown, though and something I’ll have to keep in mind in the future…like when I can actually blog on a regular basis. LOL.

    0
  8. Gwyn says:

    Thanks for this, Jenn. It sounds like a great idea. My blog has been stagnant for months because it seemed a waste of precious time. Something like this, after I make the jump, of course, 😉 could prove invaluable.

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      I hear ya on the precious time, Gwyn. I wish I had more of it. That’s why I blog with content every other week and post a picture prompt in between. I’m spread entirely too thin.

      Keep in mind, the Ruby blog counts. Some of us could be channeling folks here, too, not just to our personal blogs. YAY!

      Jenn!

      0
  9. Rita Henuber says:

    I’ve resisted simply because I already have more than I can handle. I do have questions. What so you think the ratio of readers is? Is it beneficial for the occasional blogger? Do you need to be involved every day?

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      Rita~
      The ratio to readers would depend on your tribe (who are your tribe mates? friends? other writers? book reviewers?) and who your tribe mates Twitter followers are (who follows your tribe mates). Honestly, I couldn’t give you a definitive answer as the variables would be constantly in flux.

      I think it can be beneficial to the occasional blogger, yes. And if you were to reblog some of your tribe mate’s posts, then you could be increasing your own readership.

      You do not have to be involved everyday. However there bones you could earn if you did. And it might save you time in the long run if you did pop in everyday. For me, I log in every morning to approve my tribe mates posts. I am literally done in one minute. Seriously. The posts I approve are sent out via Twitter every 20 minutes until my stream is empty. If I waited to do it once a week, it would take me more time to approve the posts. This is my system. But everyone works in their own way.

      Hope I helped answer your questions.

      Jenn!

      0
  10. Great topic, Jenn. I’d heard of Triberr months ago but didn’t have time to investigate, and then I hadn’t heard of it again. I have the same questions as Rita – is it something an occasional blogger (or someone who only belongs to group blogs) can benefit from?

    Thanks for the information!

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      Anne Marie~
      See above reply to Rita. HAHA!

      It can still be beneficial to the occasional blogger. But it is much more effective for those who blog regularly, no doubt. Triberr is another social media platform that we as writers would have to use to determine if it is right for us as individuals.

      Jenn!

      0
  11. Dino Dogan says:

    There ARE secret cannibalistic rituals being performed. So you were totally wrong about that 🙂

    Great post, thnx for introducing our little platform to your readers, Jenn.

    Dino
    Founder of Triberr

    0
    • jbrayweber says:

      Hey Dino! I want in on that cannibalistic fun. 😉

      I’ve been a member since very near to the beginning and Triberr is a part of my daily routine. I think the whole concept is genius. Kudos for the improvements and evolution of the platform.

      And thanks for the continued support you and Dan have shown.

      Jenn!

      0
  12. Amanda Brice says:

    Interesting. I’d seen people mention “I’m a member of 5 tribes on Triberr” but didn’t really bother to check it out since I don’t tweet and I only belong to group blogs. I FB stuff a LOT, but I don’t maintain my own individual blog, so I figured it wouldn’t be something for me.

    Am I wrong? How does one join? Or more importantly, how does one find tribes to join? Do you have to be invited? Do you need to know a special handshake?

    0
  13. jbrayweber says:

    Yes, Amanda! You can do more with Triberr than just individual blogs. Your group blogs can totally reap the rewards. My blog, MuseTracks, is actually co-hosted. I have 3 other MuseTrackers, but only one keeps to a schedule like I do. Every time any of us on the blog posts, the blog shows up in the tribe stream for all the tribe mates to share.

    Here are a couple of links to help with joining a tribe. No special handshake needed!

    http://alltriberr.com/a-guide-to-getting-started-on-triberr/

    http://alltriberr.com/how-to-find-a-tribe-to-join-how-to-request-to-join-a-tribe/

    Jenn!

    0
  14. This is so cool, Jenn!!! Thanks for this info. I had no idea!

    0
  15. I had no idea this even existed, Jenn. Thanks for the information! Off to check it out.

    0
  16. […] (This post originally appeared October 5, 2012 on The Ruby-Slippered Sisterhood blog.) […]

    0

Subscribe to the Blog

The Latest Comments

  • Valen Cox: Sharon! My heart is with you with all you must do for your sons and their particular issues! You must be a...
  • Valen Cox: Oh Erin! Thank you for dropping in! And to remember the most important touch of all–priceless and to...
  • Valen Cox: Amy! Love Love Love your comments! From the moment of birth, touch is so critical to thriving and your...
  • Valen Cox: Diane!! Missing you, Girlfriend! Thank you for your very kind words and taking time out to drop in! I will...
  • Valen Cox: Laurie! I love that too, the unexpected but very welcomed touch of a loved one, and in particular...

Archives