Search:
 
 

Flash Fiction Friday!

FLASH FICTION FRIDAY, WRITING CHALLENGE, AND FREE BOOKS! If you browse the internet, as we writers are wont to do, flash fiction has several defining characteristics, most of which involve word count. You will find flash fiction—also known as sudden fiction, micro fiction, quick fiction, etc.—defined as any work of fiction that is under 1,000 […]

WATCH THAT FIRST LINE. IT’S A DOOZY!! (Or it better be!)

  It was a dark and stormy night;   The first line of Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s 1830 novel Paul Clifford is perhaps the most well-known first line ever written. Why? Because it is often considered the very worst first line ever written. In fact, it is considered such a bad first line even a dog could […]

Revision Tip – read text aloud

Here is a quick (and fun) tip to use during revisions of a manuscript. As I’m revising, I often stumble over passages in a WIP, knowing something isn’t quite right with it but having no idea why. Reading it out loud can help, but I don’t really like the sound of my own voice. I’ve […]

Do you believe in writer’s block?

I was on a writer’s panel last week, with authors from a mix of genres. Children’s books. Memoirs. Poetry. Romance. One of the questions the moderator asked was: Do you believe in writer’s block? If so, how do you get past it? After the votes were counted, we had three who believed and four who […]

Laughing in the Face of Danger Pt. II

The Hows and Whys of Using Humor to Freshen your Prose, Strengthen your Story and Deepen your Characterization. Oh, and hook your reader! DRAMA APPEALS TO EMOTION, WHEREAS COMEDY APPEALS TO THE INTELLECT In LAUGHING IN THE FACE OF DANGER PT I, we talked about the key principles of comedy and how to incorporate them […]

Laughing in the Face of Danger Pt. I

KEY PRINCIPLES OF COMEDY “Make it dark, make it grim, make it tough, but then, for the love of God, tell a joke.” —Joss Whedon Comedy, like romance, is an art form that is oft maligned. And while most comedy has the advantage of added elements like facial expression, voice intonation, timing, and body language, […]

5 Tips to Creating Fresh Plot Twists

  The title to this post should be longer. It should really read, 5 Tips to Creating Fresh Plot Twists that No One will see Coming and Will Leave your Readers Breathless and Begging for More. Whew! Before I get started on the tips, I want you to know something. I feel like I’m giving […]

The (Not-So) Dreaded Synopsis

In thinking about what I wanted to blog on, I remembered a synopsis article I’d written for my RWA chapter several years ago. In my distant memory, I’d recalled having fun with it (fun with a synopsis, you say?!?!) and dug it back up. I hope you’re forgive the re-do, but I thought it might […]

Autism and writing what you know

I give a writing craft workshop called Write What Your Family Knows. The concept is partly about research, partly about a writer’s life. By mining my family’s interests or careers, I have instant access to a (mostly) inexhaustible source of expert information. Do I want an alpha hero? Little brother is an Army retiree. Do […]

Next Page »

The Latest Comments

  • Louisa Cornell: It’s a great first line, Louise! I am looking forward to reading the book!
  • Lenee Anderson: The murderer is David’s best friend. I’m concerned if I said something along the lines of...
  • Darynda Jones: This is great, Lenee, especially for a first attempt. Wow. I’m wondering if the stakes can be...
  • Darynda Jones: YES!!! I love it, Vivi, but Autumn’s is adds that twists that grabs me. Great job both of you!
  • Heather McCollum: Yes, this works! Thank you Autumn! You are awesome!!

Archives

The Ruby Slippered Sisterhood