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Okay. I entered. Now What?

Over the past month, my Ruby-Slippered sisters have dished out advice about entering the Golden Heart® contest, told you the awesome perks of becoming one of the finalists and laid out great check lists for making your  manuscript worthy of the honor. So you’ve decided— You’re entering. Good for you!

You’re taking the RS sisters’ advice and polished your wip and mailed off your baby in plenty of time.  Then planning to sit back, relax and wait to see what will happen, right? Huh, no.

Writing is a business. You’ll have a polished manuscript. You need to get it out there. Query your A-list of agents and editors.   “Why?” you ask.  “Once I final, they’ll come running to me with contracts in hand.”  Hmmm, not unless they’re the final judge and that final judge fell in love with your story. However, if that scenario palys out, how will you know if that contract is the best deal in town? After all, no one else will have seen your work. And do you really want to say to an offering editor, “Can you hold on while I query with a few other editors/agents.”

If you query your work out before the finalists are announced, three scenarios could occur. One, you could receive rejections from all of the choice industry professionals who you’ve sent the work to—maybe you’ll be lucky and receive feedback which you can take, or not, before you mail out the next round of queries. Now, if that happens, you can cross these agents and editors off your list so that when you do final you won’t waste your time sending queries to them again. Remember, being a GOLDEN HEART finalist does not change the words on the page and the subjective opinion of the work.

Two, you could gain interest and requests come in to see the completed manuscript. We’ve all heard how long it can take to hear back from agents and editors. So imagine calling that dream agent/editor and saying, I’m calling to check on the status of my requested work and by the way, it’s a 2010 Golden Heart finalist. Do you do how fast your work will be pulled out the pile and read? FAST. REAL FAST. And an offer could happen soon after. From your DREAM AGENT/EDITOR. Do you hear what I’m saying? Just ask my sisters. They’ll tell you.

Third, you could sell your work. This happened to several of the Ruby-Slippered Sisters, myself included. Is this a bad thing? Heck no! Was the surprise of placing in the contest less of a thrill? Definitely not! I still trembled while listening to the RWA representative saying, “Congratulations. You’re a Golden Heart Finalist. I hope we’ll see you in D.C.” My reply, “I’m packing tonight.”
evilswitness_w3680_680

As my RS sister Addison said, by selling ahead of time we didn’t feel the same pressure the other sisters felt. We had stress though. While working through edits and galleys we had the stress to complete the next work, polish it and perfect a pitch so we’d wouldn’t lose out on the opportunities that would come our way at nationals. And they did! If you didn’t have an agent, requests were made. Or maybe the GH entry was in a genre different from the new project or older works, so other editors looked hard at you. The point is, doors opened.

So un-cross those fingers, quit praying or rubbing your lucky charm and get on with your business.

Everyone leaving a comment  today will be entered into  a drawing for a critique of their first chapter.

102 responses to “Okay. I entered. Now What?”

  1. Vivi Andrews says:

    So true that we need to keep knocking on other doors after entering the GH, Autumn! You never know which one is going to be the one that opens for you.

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    • If you don’t knock, no one will know you’re on the other side of the door. But you know this (wink) and set a great example. You sold too. Doing so, how has it effected you as a writer? Please share.

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      • Vivi Andrews says:

        Selling certainly means I’m busier – edits, galleys, promo, sending takedown notices to those #@$(* pirates who keep illegally posting my work online… and still making sure I’m always working on a new WIP so I can keep my momentum rolling. My take is: you gotta want it and if you do you never stop pushing yourself.

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  2. Gwynlyn MacKenzie says:

    Wow, Autumn. You let the hard-nosed bad girl out to play! And she got it all right.

    Sitting back and waiting won’t get the job done. Writers write. End of song, end of story. And editors and agents like seeing that your serious about your profession.

    Fabulous post, and right on the money.

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    • So true, Gwyn. Why keep chicken if it’s not producing eggs. Editors and agents don’t make dollars if you aren’t producing. And they like dollars. So back to writing that new wip, you.

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  3. Congratulations on selling, Autumn!

    Thanks for the excellent advice. No one can afford to rest on their laurels these days, can they? Sure, it’s fun being a GH finalist but you have to keep writing and learning. Someone once told me to complete as many mss possible while waiting to sell, ’cause goodness knows time will be even more limited once you have galleys, promo and deadlines to take care of when you’re published.

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    • Hey, Vanessa. Smart advice. Once you sell, the little bit of time you scratched out each week to write shrinks. It’s like the bottle opened and time was sucked in. As soon as you finish writing a novel, meaning polished to a high luster, start the next story. Believe you won’t be sorry.

      AJ

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  4. Katrina C says:

    Thanks for these tip, Autumn. I was talking to my dad the other day about my manuscript and told him I was spending the weekend finishing it (turned out to be wishful thinking!) so I could send it to the GH contest. He said, “That’s great! So what’s next?”

    I kinda fumbled my words and managed to eek out, “Uh, send it to agents, I guess?”

    Glad to see I guessed right! Next time he, or anyone else, asks what’s next, I’ll have a much better idea of where my ms goes.

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    • Oh, I’m so glad I helped. Yes, research your agents/editors. One day. Write your queries and get them out. That’s day two. On day three, start the next story, because the question, ‘What are you working on now?’ will come up, and you want the answer for that too.

      Thanks for stopping by.

      AJ

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  5. Jeannie Lin says:

    Congrats on the sale Autumn!

    Great topic and a reminder that the GH is one step in the journey. I read some advice that said you should always have something out there, a couple irons in the fire. Because as long as you have queries, contest entries, and submissions out in the publishing ether, then you’re in the race. At any moment, you can be discovered!

    The beauty of working so hard for the Golden Heart contest is that afterwards, you have a polished partial, a synopsis and a full in hand. You’re in the game now.

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    • Morning, lady. It can take months, even a year or more to hear from and agent/editor. Just think how many eons it would take to query your top ten favorite, to die to work with agent/editors. I don’t have that much time. I don’t think anyone does. A writer definitely has to have many queries out for several projects at once.

      This is a business. Walmart doesn’t have one thing on its shelf.

      Congrats to you too! You sold while at National, right? (((HUGS))) So exciting. So how has your schedule changed?

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      • Jeannie Lin says:

        Ugh, don’t let me get started about the schedule! Okay, I got started. Oh no…

        I used to be a one project gal. Now I have revisions to juggle, a new (old) book to write and another series to flesh out for after the dust settles. Not to mention a novella that I’m thumb twiddling and waiting on a response even though I know the average time is in the six month range. And I haven’t even begun to worry about promo. You’re right about the bottle opening and time just swooshing in!

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        • It sounds you’ve become really busy. Me too!
          I’ve asked for time in a bottle from my husband every, anniversary, birthday and Christmas. He still hasn’t found the gift. LOL

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  6. Kim Law says:

    Great reminders, Autumn. No sitting around waiting! We must constantly keep pushing forward. I say this all while knowing how bad I’ve been slacking lately. Okay, you’re inspired me. I’m off to my WIP to see what I can accomplish before I have to do that paying job stuff.

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  7. Elise Hayes says:

    Great point about using the time between now and March 25th to send out queries, Autumn. I’m one of those who thought that it would make more sense to wait until the call for finalists came out, but you’ve definitely changed my thinking!

    One more thing to add: in addition to sending out those queries, keep writing! If your GH entry is all polished and shiny, then start the next book. You always want a wip (work in progress) when you’re talking to editors/agents.

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    • EXCELLENT, Elise. Thanks for bringing up that point. (Knocking fist against head) How did I forget that bit of advice? Yes write. Start the next book.

      Definitely get off those hands and query. Time goes by too fast. And the Golden Heart is not a guarantee to get representation or sell. If you do get feedback from you dream agent and editor, you can revise and then when you do final you can say “Hey, I took your advice and rewrote. Would you like to see it again? It’s a Golden Heart finalist.” GRIN

      Thanks for helping me out this morning. (Wink) AJ

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  8. I’m glad I inspired you, Kim. Ah the dreadful day job. I have a hellish one too. Tends to suck the big time on most days. I’m going to hang a new comfy pair of PJs up in my view for incentive. You know the commerical for yogurt with the little yellow bikini. My goal, to quit the day job and stay home in the PJs.

    Come over to the chat room. Some of the sisters have been challanging all weekend and believe me, doing so has added pages to my work and a twist. YEAH! All are invited. The chat works better with Firefox browser. Easy to download. I did it and if I can do it anyone can. But our Tech Goddess, Eliz, is working hard to IE to love the chat room too. So please stop over.

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  9. Diana Layne says:

    Really good tell it like it is post, Autumn! I wished I’d had this last year, because I spent more than first half of this year playing catch up because I was resting on my laurels, sigh. After entering so many years and not making the finals, I simply let myself get complacent, and yeah, the universe has a warped sense of humor and I paid for that by making the finals this year. Ha! Keep kicking butts, some of us need it!

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    • LOL. I know, Diana. Becoming complacent is so eazzzy to do. But, your sisters have aim at your backside now. LOL. I hope I kicked gently. See you in the chat tonight.

      HUGS,
      AJ

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  10. Beth Trissel says:

    Great post Autumn and so wise. Listen to her, ladies. I was thrilled to be a 2008 finalist. How times zips along. Now I’m entering the RITA. Talk about dreaming big.

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  11. Hey, Beth. So glad you stopped by. (((HUGS))) Congrats on the 2008 GH final, and you go, lady. RITA. I’ll be pulling for you.

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  12. Lynn Romaine says:

    Hi Autumn – nice blog site! Very captivating – as for GH – I’m not a complete promo for it, even though I’m on the board of a national chapter of RWA. While I feel it’s always good to jump in the pool and you may win a medal, it’s not a very satisfying contest for the rest of the entrants since there is no feedback. My other complain (whine) is that the judges are amateur – or our peers – now that’s a good thing in many ways since we want to please the readers, but if you’re looking for feedback on how to improve your writing and master the craft (which I always am), it’s not the best contest to enter. I entered a few others that gave me great feedback – so the final points are: 1) always jump in a pool or across a line never crossed when possible but 2) be clear on what your goals are out of going there – good luck ladies!
    http://www.womenwritersunderground.blogspot.com – Lynn romaine

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    • So true, Lynn. You must be clear on what your goals are in entering the Golden Heart. My sisters, over the pass month have discussed the pros and cons of entering the contest. It’s not a contest for someone who is looking for feedback. The Golden Road is not for everyone. They must pick their own path and in order to reach their goal they must keep moving on.

      Thank you so much for stopping by today. I hope we see you again.
      AJ

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    • Jeannie Lin says:

      I totally agree about the contest feedback. The GH is an expensive lottery ticket in some ways, and all you get back is five cold, hard numbers (and a dream).

      It’s good to know what you’re getting into so you don’t get disappointed and get your money’s worth.

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  13. It definitely doesn’t pay to sit back and wait with anything in life. It’s important to get your work out there, even after you’re published. Always have some ready to sell so that you are always on the shelf. It’s the only way you’ll develop the name rocognition that will build your career.

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  14. Judy Keim says:

    Good post, Autumn! So glad to see you doing so well. And whether you’re a Golden Heart finalist or not, you have to keep writing and querying on your contest entries and others, just as you’ve advised. Thanks!

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  15. Thanks, Judy. I’m so glad I got it right. Hope to see you again.

    AJ

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  16. Kaily Hart says:

    Great way to put the GH into perspective!! You can’t afford to just sit back and wait in this industry. It has been personally difficult to adjust to the long wait and lead times. I’ve learned the hard way you have to always have something out there, something ready to go and something in progress. I’ve entered 2 manuscripts this year. Now I have to polish and deliver those suckers by the deadline! This blog has been incredibly informative!

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    • Jeannie Lin says:

      Isn’t waiting awful? That’s what I like about contests — they have set deadlines for announcements.

      Good luck with your two submissions!

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    • Oh, I hate waiting. I’m sure we all do. Put it’s a beast we’ve got to deal with in this business.
      Deadlines sure make me put my butt in chair. Good luck on the two entries.

      Aj

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  17. Tina Canon says:

    Hi Autumn–

    Thanks for the blog. Another reason I’m entering the GH is to have a firm deadline so that I can start querying agents. I plan to do both at the same time! Your blog made me realize I’m on the right track!

    Thanks,
    tina

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  18. Tina Joyce says:

    Great post, Autumn, and a good reminder that you need to keep moving in this industry, even when it seems like everything around you is going in slow motion. It kind of reminds me of cogs in a wheel. The little cog (the writer) has to turn at a much faster rate than the big one (the publishing industry), if the whole thing is going to work properly. The slower we move, the slower the big cog moves.

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  19. Robin Kaye says:

    Great post, Autumn~

    I’m one of those who sold to one of the final judges. I was very lucky. While I was awaiting the results of the GH, I was polishing the manuscript, though I would have been better off taking juggling lessons. I sold in August 2007 and my third book comes out this December. Invariably I have a month-long blog tour the same month my book is due (this is the third time it’s happened.) Then I have revisions for one book when I’m going over copy edits for another, and then galleys when I’m on a hard deadline. And on top of that, I have a husband, three kids and I’m supposed to have a life. I’m still trying to figure it all out. Now back to my book on deadline….

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    • Robin, Your experience was definitely a Golden Heart Cinderalla story. KUDOS! You’re an inspiration to me too. You know that. Life after publication does get busier, so no excuses while un-pubbed. remember to breathe though.

      Thanks for your support, sweetie and MEGA sales.
      (((Hugs)))
      AJ

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  20. Kathye Quick says:

    Entering contests is a great idea, but it could be a double edged sword. You have to be prepared for anything and then take a deep breath if the result isn’t what you expected or hoped.

    Of course, finalling and winning is wonderful!

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    • Hey KQ. You’re so right about contests and the double edge sword. There are a lot of great writers out there who give constructive feedback, and then there is a judge who is so harsh (we’ve labeled her the East German judge) who can really deflate a writer’s ego. The lesson to learn, you have to take what resounds with you and keep plugging ahead.

      Thanks for your support. I hope you check out the rest of the blog. My RS sisters have really done a great job on their posts. I’ve learned something new everyday.

      (((HUGS))) AJ

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  21. CJ Chase says:

    Great post, Autumn. I’m going to throw out a question for everyone, of something that occurred to me last night.

    I’ve noticed that recently many agents aren’t responding to all queries. I’ve seen phrases such as “if we haven’t responded in x weeks, you can assume we are not interested in the project.” I actually added an if-you-haven’t-heard-by column to my submissions chart. In light of that, does the A-list, B-list idea of sending out queries/partials still apply?

    I had sent out 5 queries/partials earlier this month. A few people had suggested some other names. Being the well-trained writer I am, I figured I’d compile another list while I was waiting on the first group, and then send out queries if I got 5 no’s. And then I realized that I might not know if I had a no for 2 or even 3 months. I decided to skip the whole A-list idea, and I’ve been sending out more queries today.

    What does everyone think?

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    • CJ, IMO An A list is a list of agents who’d I think I be most like to work with and who represent your genre. Through research or networking you could find out more about other agents that would but them in the same light. So your A list would actually become longer. B lists, again to me, are agents who you are not quite sure if they’re a fit but hey, you never know. Once you talk to them and learn more they very well could be a perfect match.

      Again, time becomes an issue. I guess it’s really up to the author on the number of queries they put out at one time and how long they wait for respones.

      I’ll be interested in seeing some other POV on this.

      Thanks for bring the topic up.
      (wink)
      AJ

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    • Jeannie Lin says:

      Argh…started typing a long reply but it got eaten!

      “I’ve noticed that recently many agents aren’t responding to all queries. In light of that, does the A-list, B-list idea of sending out queries/partials still apply?

      I had sent out 5 queries/partials earlier this month. A few people had suggested some other names. Being the well-trained writer I am, I figured I’d compile another list while I was waiting on the first group, and then send out queries if I got 5 no’s. And then I realized that I might not know if I had a no for 2 or even 3 months. I decided to skip the whole A-list idea, and I’ve been sending out more queries today.”

      I think you’re right about not holding back to wait for one or two responses. I queried in rounds of around 10-15 and sometimes there was overlap between the rounds. For some of us, it comes down to a numbers game. I needed to cast a very wide net to find an agent who would take a chance on me. *blushes*

      That being said, I did split my rounds into high, middle, low. I was very glad to have an arsenal of dream agents left when things started heating up.

      There’s nothing to keep you from re-querying an agent who rejected you early in the process if you really want them — I didn’t requery because I figured they weren’t excited about my concept so I thought I’d go with agents who hadn’t passed yet.

      Also, when things get interesting, query like crazy whoever is left! I don’t know…I felt I was close when multiple agents were requesting fulls and fulls after partials in about a two week timespan. If you have those irons out, then you are perfectly within rights to nudge with news that someone else is interested! Although this can be a two-edged sword. Ask Darynda!

      What does everyone think?

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    • rita says:

      CJ, to start I sent out five queries one week. Waited a week and sent out five more. After that it was two a week. When I received one no thank you I sent out two more queries. I did not send many queries to those who posted the if you don’t hear from us thing. Twice I emailed an agent asking if they received my query because I had not received a reply in their stated time. They did not have my query and both requested partials. BTW I preferred an agent who wanted to see a few pages with my query letter.
      I started querying the first week in February and was represented by the first week in June. I sent out 43 queries.
      I started with query tracker because there you can put your genre in and see who represents it. Next I checked predators and editors and the agents web page. I kept those query letters flowing. I looked at it like a business. If I was selling cars I wouldn’t wait days or weeks for one person to get back with me I would keep trying to sell the car. First person with the cash wins.
      When I stopped sending queries I had withdrawal shakes.

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  22. Shoshana Brown says:

    Great post, Autumn. Now, off to write some query letters. 🙂

    Shoshana

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  23. I have a list of about 80 agents. I divided them up into groups of ten and sent 10 queries at a time a week apart.

    IMO Sending a few queries at a time doesn’t work because of the lead time agents need. I once recieved a no a year after I sent the query.

    I sent 60 queries out in 6 weeks. The only hitch happened when an agent asked for an exclusive on a partial and I already had a few partials out.

    I think agents pretty much know you have to throw the net wide and my ‘dream agent’ has changed over the years.

    This is a wonderful blog. I’ll be sure to come back!

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    • Lynne, Great job on getting the queries out there. You’re right, agents and editors have been around the block a few times.

      I’m glad you liked the post and blog.

      (GRIN)

      AJ

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    • Jeannie Lin says:

      “The only hitch happened when an agent asked for an exclusive on a partial and I already had a few partials out.”

      This sounds very much like my process, though I spread it out over about six months. I just wanted to say this is not necessarily bad. Most agents understand if you just tell them other agents have already requested it so you can’t give an exclusive. (I think it’s to your advantage.) If you do want to give an exclusive, make sure there’s a time limit so they don’t tie up your querying for too long. I’m not sure how much time is reasonable — anyone have any ideas?

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  24. Great advice, Autumn! Sometimes it’s easy to just sit back and take a wait and see approach. But writing IS a business. If we want to succeed we have to go out there and seize every opportunity. Be proactive, not reactive. I fall into the reactive trap sometimes, and your post was a great reminder to keep moving forward!

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  25. Katrina W says:

    What a great reminder! I was kind of thinking entry in the mail = end, instead of a beginning. I like to think I wouldn’t have sat around waiting for the Call but you’ve really given me something to think about. Thanks!

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    • Don’t wait. Waiting is not good. By the time you get to Nationals you could be wearing a first sale ribbon with the Golden Heart ribbon. Believe me, they do look nice together. (GRIN) So go. Work on those queries.

      AJ

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  26. Ronempress says:

    Great post, Autumn and congratulations on the sale! Back to work! (Unfortunately, or not, depending on your outlook, this is the kind of job that pays. LOL)

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    • Thanks. I know about the day job. I’m on lunch break and have meetings later. I’d much rather be working on my MS. SIGH, I’ll have to wait unitl tonight.

      Thank for commenting. (((hugs))) AJ

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  27. Sonya says:

    I’m working hard to get my entry in to the Golden Heart. I’ve never entered before-I kept ‘just missing’ the deadline.

    Great post, Autumn.

    Sonya

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  28. Sonya, lady. I’m so glad you stopped by. I hope you make into the Golden Heart this year. I’ll crack my whip over you head if you need me to. I’d love to meet you in TN.

    This lady wows me with all she does. She doesn’t sit on her hands. An inspiration, really.

    HUGE HUG, AJ

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  29. Great advice, Autumn. Proactive is the name of the game!

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  30. Good post; this is the approach I’m trying to learn. You can’t always wait for opportunity to find you, sometimes you just have to go out there and find opportunity yourself!

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  31. Back into a meeting in 2, but before I do. Does any one have more advice for CJ (above)?

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  32. Misty Evans says:

    I enjoyed reading your blog, Autumn. You have great advice for many writers!

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  33. Vikki Bakus says:

    Autumn,
    What helpful and inspiring advice. Now, all I need do s complete a manuscript. Off to tackle Chapter 2 for the 40th time! Thanks for the motivational speech 🙂

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  34. Liz Talley says:

    Read the post earlier this morning – finally have time to comment.

    My take – enter and then pretend your didn’t. Work hard to get yourself in the doors of agents and editors without relying on any contests. Finaling in the GH is icing on the cake – but if you don’t final in it or any other, you’ve still got to do all you can to get yourself out there. Or in there. Whichever.

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  35. I’d been planning to get back to my WIP, which I stopped working on because I decided this other MS was more ready for the GH. (Little did I know, editing it is more work than writing another 40,000 words would have been!)

    But I’ve also been thinking it’s time to get an agent. Guess I should devote some time to that, too. If only I knew how to start … Looks like Query Tracker is a resource to look into. Is that online?

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    • Rita says:

      You have to be a member of Query tracker but its free.
      It’s a good place to start looking. I suggest you not rely on any one place for info.
      Take a look at Query Shark. it gives you a good idea of what not to do with a query. most agents will tell you what they expect on their submission pages.
      best advice is to research, research, research.

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  36. Ronempress says:

    Query Tracker, Agent Query and Litmatch are all great resources. I’m one of the Beta Testers for the new Litmatch site and it will be nice when it launches next month. They are all online resources.

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  37. June says:

    Great post, AJ. It really spoke to me. Seriously. I’ve been slacking lately. Kind of letting stress get me down, but you know what? You’ve totally put some things in perspective for me. Thanks for telling it like it is. I needed that little kick. Now, to write, write, write and submit, submit, submit.

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  38. Addison Fox says:

    AJ –

    Great post! I’m bummed it’s taken me all day to finally chime in, but in reading through your post and then the comments, the running theme is clearly – ALWAYS HAVE SOMETHING IN THE WORKS!! And it’s so important. Publishing moves slow, but when things do start moving, publishers want to see you can produce. Working so that you always have an active project is a fantastic way to prepare for that.

    One other thing I’d add – the Golden Heart is an amazing contest and the opportunities it offers finalists are – forgive me! – pure gold. That said, the GH is once a year. ALL year, agents accept queries, chapter contests happen, editors take appointments at local conferences. The GH is yet one other tool to get your foot in the door, but it shouldn’t be seen as the only avenue.

    Addison

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    • I’m glad you made it, Addison. I had started my next book right away. When Nationals rolled around I had a story to pitch. I ended up with requests from both agents and and editor. I think you did too, right?

      AJ

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      • Addison Fox says:

        I was in a very comparable situation. I actually sold an adult paranormal series and my finalist category was YA, so it’s been great to have material in both genres. In addition to having the work to market, I personally find that jumping between the two genres helps to stay fresh.

        There’s just something about channeling your inner 15 year old that’s very freeing!!! 🙂

        Addison

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        • Gwynlyn MacKenzie says:

          This made me laugh, Addison.

          I writer Science Fiction Romance as well as Historical. While the Historicals have done well, the Sci-Fi languishes, but when I do get to go into that world and play, I call it “channeling my inner Danny.” Danny happens to be my baby brother (his twin is my baby sis)–who is a real sci-fi, fantasy, roll-playing, good-hearted, never gonna grow up sort. Pretty much the opposite of me and his twin sis. 😉

          As soon as I finish the 100K Challenge, I think I’m gonna go play a while….

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        • Oh, I agree. I wrote Obsessed By Wildfire, a fun, sexy, contemporary after writing Evil’s Witness. I had a ball doing so and afterwards, I was ready to dive back into RS. Writing outside your own box has its perks.

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  39. Great post, Autumn. I needed that kick in the pants too! Always have something out there–so you’ve got a chance. Finish one, start the next. Okay, on to my next . . . Thanks for sharing!

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  40. Kathy Kulig says:

    Excellent post and advice Autumn. Keep writing, keep submitting, and don’t give up.

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    • I know you know this, Kathy. You’re a great example. Thank you so much for stopping by to see me. Good luck in NJ this weekend with your presentation. I know you’ll do fab.

      HUGS,

      AJ

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  41. Shea Berkley says:

    Relax? No way! Once you’ve finished and polished a manuscript and sent it off, you’ve got to start a new one. There is never a time when you should be sitting back and thinking alls good. An interested editor/agent might not want the book you sent her, but she may love the idea you’re working on and want a partial ASAP. The writing life is full of surprises. Always expect the unexpected.

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  42. Darynda Jones says:

    This is a great post, di!!!!! My service was so wishy washy yesterday, I didn’t get to comment. 🙁

    Hugs you!
    ~D~

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  43. Melissa says:

    This was just what I needed, Di! Great advice and tips. Now I just need to sit my bootie in the chair and get it done! LOL

    0

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