Search:
 
 

Posts tagged with: writer’s life

It’s WEEK THREE check in time!

Happy check in day, friends!

I know week three has come and gone. Crazy, isn’t it? Didn’t we just get started?

If you’re like me, you may have had some set backs. Weekends are particularly tough for me because, um, family. They’re so demanding. They like to be fed and have clean clothes and stuff. And, if I’m being honest, I’ve been binge-watching Game of Thrones and addictions to television programs can also be demanding. They call to me – “Liz, come sit down for thirty minutes. Half an episode, that’s all…” and five hours later I’m staggering to the fridge for more Halo Top ice cream and feeling that old familiar guilt – the you’re-supposed-to-be-writing guilt.

But that’s okay because I’m still going. It’s like a diet. You fall off and eat half a piece of chocolate cake, but the next day you have a salad. I’ve been eating my salads, too, and to date have added 14K to my WIP during the past three weeks. That’s pretty darn good. <Blowing on my knuckles and wiping them on my shirt.>

So don’t worry if you’ve been distracted or commandeered by other issues like the flu, the day job or Netflix, we’re still in this, friends, no matter how successful or unsuccessful you’ve been over the past three weeks. 

Here are some things you can do to up your game:

  • Set aside a particular time to write…and stick to it
  • Visit the chatroom. Hands down this is the best way to WWF. I’m serious. Go to the chatroom.
  • Ignore your inner editor
  • Or not. Progress is progress even if you must stop mid-book and return to the beginning to make sure your not wasting words. (Admission: this is what I had to do)
  • Indulge your muse. If you’re stuck, take a walk, read a book or listen to inspiring music
  • Read the daily inspirational posts at the WWF page here
  • Don’t be so hard on yourself
  • Or do. Sometimes you have to get real with yourself and recommit to your writing. That book ain’t gonna write itself.

So time to check in. If you’ve made your goal for the week, type I MADE MY GOAL in all caps at the beginning of your post. We’re going to do back flips (not real ones because most of us are too old for that…or maybe it’s just me that’s too old). But if you didn’t reach your goal, you’re still invited to tell us what’s going on. This isn’t about wagging our fingers at anyone. Nope. Not here. 

And we have prizes….

The fabulous Katie Graykowski has offered up a “First Chapter Critique (any genre except erotica)”

Kate Parker is giving out a $20 Amazon gift card (MORE books!)

And Heather McCollum has a PRIZE BUNDLE: $10 gift card to Starbucks and a digital copy of THE BEAST of AROS CASTLE

 

Okay, so leave a comment and let’s start week four with enthusiasm, determination and a smile on our faces! 

 

 

Using the Power of Words to Reach Your Goals

This is the time of year when we make goals or think about where we want to go or what we want to do in life. Some of us make lists with steps. Some of us just ponder or “dream.” Wherever you fall on the goals measuring line, I have a powerful tool to help you reach them. The tool is called a positive affirmation.

You may have heard of them before, but are you using them? Hmmm…? Even though I know how helpful these statements are, I stop doing them too. So, let’s take a little refresher together.

An affirmation is a statement, repeated either verbally, mentally, and/or through writing. When we review the words, it makes our body and mind believe they are real. And when we believe, we realign our world around that truth. Of course, we can’t bring back the dead, cure incurable diseases, or win the lottery just by saying positive affirmations – but they can help us immensely.

We’ve all seen the horrific impact of negative affirmations on people. People become their own bullies by mentally or verbally telling themselves they are failures or worse. This is self-sabotage. If you berate yourself, try talking to yourself as you would to a friend or even an acquaintance. Chances are you’ll speak kinder to yourself.

Be careful to create the positive affirmation correctly. You don’t want to inadvertently make things more negative!

  1. The statement should be specific and about something you are not yet, but want to be. Don’t feel like you’re lying. It is supposed to be something that is NOT true – yet (or that you don’t feel is true).
  2. It must be in present tense. If you say “I will be a successful writer,” that describes the future, and you won’t get there because the future is always out of reach. Replace “will be” with “am”.
  3. Use ONLY positive words. If you say “I never stop writing” your psyche will hear “stop” and leave out the “never”. Don’t say “I hate sweets.” Instead say “I love healthy food” or your mind will focus on “sweets”. There is always a way to make a statement positive.
  4. Write the statements down and post them somewhere visible. Say them out loud at least two times a day.

At one time I had ten stickies stuck to my bathroom mirror with affirmations. I recommend starting with just a few so it doesn’t seem like a chore. Some people put them in their cars so that every time they get in, they repeat the affirmations. I’ve also seen posters, which people have made with pictures and words, representing their goals – a vision board.

You may want to warn spouses or people who share the area with you. When I was trying to get pregnant I wrote “I am pregnant” on a sticky note for the bathroom mirror, so obviously I had to tell my husband what was up (BTW – I got pregnant : ).

Right around the time I submitted my manuscript, which was a finalist in the 2009 Golden Hearts, I was writing and saying “I am a published writer.” Before I even found out that I was a finalist, I sold two manuscripts.

When I was fighting ovarian cancer with grueling chemo and surgery, I said a list of thirty positive affirmations at least twice a day. I wrote new ones each night. “My body is full of health.” “My stomach is calm.” “I sleep deeply and peacefully through the night.” I used to cry them, pray them, scream them, but I made certain to say them. They served me well, helping me to calm down and shift my focus from panic to determined survival (and now I’m a 6-year survivor).

Positive affirmations.

They are simple. They work.

At this time of year, when goals are in the forefront, write a few positive affirmations and watch how powerful they can be, moving you toward positive outcomes. Here’s a brief list of some of my favorites.

 

 

 

 

I write on my manuscript every day.

I love to eat healthy food.

I do yoga and get 10K steps in every day.

I am calm and peaceful when dealing with my kids.

Every part of my body is healthy and comfortable.

I am living a long and healthy life.

I am powerful, confident and successful.

 

What are some of your positive affirmations?

Have a fabulous, full-of-positivity day!

Heather

E-mail: Heather@HeatherMcCollum.com
Website: www.HeatherMcCollum.com
Face book: https://www.facebook.com/HeatherMcCollumAuthor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HMcCollumAuthor

How Physical Traits Influence Character

Confession: I forgot what day today was. Literally forgot it was Thursday; thought it was Wednesday and I’d have another day to write a blog post. And since I spend the bulk of Thursday night (and Wednesday morning) at the animal shelter, I didn’t have much time to think of fresh content. Luckily, I found this intriguing little self-reflective post from 2009 when I was undergoing a significant physical problem that challenged my identity and had me wondering how a character’s physical appearance impacts their emotional life.

It’s awfully cute and a little bit painful. My dad was still alive back then; my son wasn’t even conceived! Life was simpler, and I was honestly a different person with very different priorities and goals. If I could go back in time, I would tell myself so many, many things…

Many of you know that I had shoulder surgery last January [2009] to repair a ring of detached cartilage and muscle, a volleyball-induced mess that had been keeping me from all of my favorite hobbies and a chunk of my duties as a zookeeper. Though I didn’t know the extent of the injury before the surgery, I’d hoped the surgeon would provide a relatively quick fix—the most likely procedure would require a three-month healing period plus another six to nine months of rehabilitation. It didn’t sound too bad. I felt obligated to quit zookeeping, though, just before the surgery. I couldn’t see a way around it, and besides, wouldn’t it be nice to spend the year of recovery writing?

Stretch Your Wings: Top Ten Tips for Introverts at Conferences

Before I began attending writers’ conferences, I thought of myself as an extrovert.

Dressed for battle in gray wool and white silk, I fearlessly strode into my first conference ready to conquer the romance-writing world. I’d thought of writing as a profession, and by that time, I was awfully good at being professional. I was ready to kick ass and take names on my way to the top.

But instead of businesspeople giving each other firm handshakes and exchanging business cards, I saw women running into each others’ arms and huddling in tight little groups, dishing gossip and reminiscing like long-lost friends.

Which they were, of course. They weren’t competitors. They weren’t colleagues.

They were friends.

Panic tightened my throat as my stomach lurched. I realized my error, for this wasn’t a work conference.

This was high school!

PROCRASTINATION: A Day In The Life…

I wake up with dread, knowing I have an ironclad this-is-really-it deadline looming. I’ve delayed long enough. The book is written, but other tasks MUST be completed. Final edits. Uploading files. Newsletter draft. Create ads. Schedule a blog tour. Secure beta readers. Update website. On and on. These tasks are not my strong points, but I must stay focused.

I routinely start my day with exercise, because good health is imperative. I never let anything—except bad weather or a good book—interfere with my morning exercise. Unless I get invited out for breakfast. Or I sleep late. But whatever. Exercise is important.

After my power walk (stroll), I’m hot and tired. While cooling down with a glass of iced tea, and maybe, a cinnamon roll, I check my iPad for what’s going on in the world of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. I post a couple of comments, just to stay relevant. And then, I check email, because I might have a request for a speaking engagement, a note from a reader, or an ad from Amazon tempting me to purchase more books. I don’t need more books, but it’s almost a professional obligation to check out the competition and see what authors and titles are being promoted.

Three purchases later, I’ve wasted—or invested—too much time in social media, but I haven’t played any of my numerous word games. I should take a peek at them. And I shouldn’t neglect my Trivia Crack skills. You never know when a random factoid will come in handy.

The morning is slipping away, but I can still accomplish my goals. I power up my computer and settle in until I remember that a load of towels desperately needs laundering. But my husband interrupts. “What’s that?” I ask. “You want me to run to Home Depot with you to pick out paint for the kitchen? Okay, but only if we can be quick about it.” Unfortunately, choosing paint colors is more time-consuming than it sounds. Especially after investigating the possibility of replacing the kitchen cabinets. And flooring.

But now it’s time to get busy, and I’m ready. Except that my stomach growls. Got to keep up my strength. I could eat at my desk, but it’s so pretty outside. I’ll be more capable of working all afternoon, if I get a little fresh air. Before returning to my office, I realize I never put those towels in the dryer, and that absolutely has to be done.

Time to get on those edits, but didn’t I schedule a Ruby blog this week? What was I planning to blog about? FACE THE MUSIC, my upcoming release? Astrophysics? Concert pianists? Motorcycle clubs? Topics skitter through my brain. Nothing gels.

Maybe a snack would help. I should put on some chili for supper. Oops, there goes the mailman. Is that a hang nail? Where are my nail clippers? Did I forget to make an appointment for my mammogram?

And so it goes. When I’m writing a manuscript, or even doing revisions, I’ll gladly stay glued in my chair. Promotion and pre-publication stuff just screams out for procrastination. But I’ll get it done. I have to. I have a deadline. But excuse me, please, my dryer is beeping. Towels don’t just fold themselves, you know.

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072DTF7C5

Jacie Floyd’s contemporary romance and romantic comedies are emotionally-rich stories about strong women and bold men. From 2001 to 2013, she was a six-time RWA Golden Heart Finalist and two-time Golden Heart winner. Since abandoning her day job in 2014, she has self-published seven books and a novella. Her eighth book, FACE THE MUSIC, from the Good Riders series, is now available for pre-order with a May 25 release date.

She loves hearing from readers and writers and invites you to contact her at:

Website: www.JacieFloyd.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JacieFloyd/

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/JacieFloyd/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jaciefloyd

AuthorCentral: https://authorcentral.amazon.com/gp/profile

 

 

 

Are Blogs History?

Recently, behind the red curtain, the question ‘if blogs are history’ came up and a great discussion followed.   It’s hard for us to know the correct answer, because our brick counter tells us we have between 650 – 1000 reads a day, which is pretty awesome. And some days, only sisters comment while on others the world speaks up. This same question arose at my local writers meeting this past weekend.  

Promotion is a big topic for writers, whether you’re traditionally pubbed or self-pubbed. Blog tours are still on the list of things an author must do, but should they be?

So the questions today are:

Are blogs like the Ruby Sisterhood helpful to the writing community? (Do you love the Rubies?)

Do writers see a ROI on doing blog tours?

Do readers really read blogs?

Please chime in. And if you have blogs that helped with promotion of your work, please share.

Always

I’m a firm believer that you should never stop learning. On my last day walking this earth, I intend to learn something about this world, or the world I’m about to enter, or myself.

I wince when I hear people say they don’t need to know this or that. Why won’t you want to know something about everything?

Since this is a blog for writers and we focus mainly on the craft of writing and publishing industry and elements related to both, I’ll speak to the authors reading this. Never stop studying the craft. Never turn a deaf ear to information that relates to your small business. Never stop learning about humanity and the world, because they feed your creative well.

No moment in time has offered us so many venues in which we can expand our minds. We have the ability to fly to the other side of the world in a day and experience cultures our forefathers never heard of. We can open a window to the worldwide web and learn about every uncover stone in history, and steps that will change our world today, tomorrow, in years to come.

We are friends to people all over the globe and share our daily lives, hopes and dreams, having never met them face to face.

Since the majority of information shared is through written word, we have a responsibility to humanity to never stop educating ourselves and share what we’ve learned, be it through poetry, screenplays, non-fiction or fiction, but the majority of us, on government income tables, qualify as starving artist. So how can we continue to learn, to improve ourselves as artists?

There are so many avenues that cost little or nothing. Here are ten ways.

  • Blogs like the Ruby Slippered Sisterhood, where experienced writers who published, both traditionally and independently, and are willing to share their journeys and help guide others.
  • Many authors have writer related archives on their websites where they share articles on craft.
  • Local or National writing organizations. There is nothing like being in a room with other writers, even if the group is small.
  • On-line writers groups. Check RWA for info on on-line chapters.
  • Craft books. Buy used if on a budget, or trade off with other writers.
  • Industry related magazines. Check for on-line magazines also. Many are free.
  • Conferences or workshops. Many conferences are breaking down their venues and offering the purchased of one day, two day or entire conference packages, making attending more affordable to some.
  • Conference workshop recordings. If you can’t attend the event, this is the next best thing.
  • On-line classes. I, and several other Ruby Sisters, love Margie Lawson classes (margielawson.com). Intense, but worth the time and money! And I’ve taken Master classes from James Patterson and Arron Sorken through masterclass.com. I review classes constantly. Michael Hauge also offers a lot of information on his website, storymastery.com.
  • Reading. You can learn about the craft just by studying your favorite authors’ works. Whether you write every day or not,  reading, learning, every day should be a priority.

 

There are more venues to help you on your journey and I know some of the sisters will jump in and offer them up, but if something has helped you, please share in the comments below.

 

Autumn Jordon is the award-winning author of romantic suspense-mystery-thrillers such as her Golden Heart Finalist and Golden Leaf winner His Witness To Evil. After her family business was comprised by The Russian Mafia and the FBI investigated, she grabbed her note pad and pen and went on to interview the agents. Join her newsletter at www.autumnjordon.com and be privy to upcoming releases, sales, and events. Also, you’ll receive free reads and be entered into her monthly contest for great prizes.

 

 

 

Write On 2017! – Time Management

For the past eight weeks in our Write on 2017 series, we’ve explored ways to stay on course and on fire about our writing. Today we’re going to wrap up the series by discussing the most asked question I get when I give productivity workshops to writers, and that is, “How can I find more time to write?”

If you’ve already made writing a priority (remember this little clown?), it’s not a matter of finding time but better using the time you have. Here are a few quick tips:

1. Clock in for Business – While most of us do not have time clocks to punch when we start writing, there are a number of ways to “cross the threshold” into work. Sit in your writing chair and declare that your workday has begun. Put up a sign that says “Writer at Work.” Or create a writing log and sign in. The key is creating a block of time to write and then honoring that commitment. You wouldn’t cheat an employer out of an honest day’s work; don’t cheat yourself.

2. Minimize Distractions – Turn off all notifications on your phone. Disconnect your computer from the Internet. Tell your family or roommates that you are not to be disturbed unless there is a fire or flood. If it helps, pop in ear buds with the music of your choice or use a sound-streaming service such as Brain FM to improve focus and productivity.

3. Create to-do lists – Before your dedicated writing time, jot down everything you’d like to accomplish, things like number of new words you want to write or pages to edit. Planning ahead will keep you focused and provide a roadmap when you’re not sure where to go next.

4. Report to a goal or productivity partner – Every Monday I send an e-mail to one of my critique partners reporting what I accomplished in my writing world the week prior and what my plans are for the week ahead. She chimes in with praise or cyber hugs then shares her weekly writing update. We’ve been holding each other accountable for more than ten years, and I can tell you I’ve kicked out some pretty impressive word counts in the hours before our check-ins.

5. Tackle tough stuff first – If you’re struggling with a scene or a bit of research, get to it while you’re fresh. Tackling the tough stuff first will free up your mind and will most likely give you a boost of confidence.

6. Writing Sprints – If you’re having a hard time getting started, set a timer for twenty minutes and write, even if it’s something like, “I don’t know what to write” or “This story is giving me fits”. The act of engaging your fingers and putting words on the page should loosen things up. In addition, knowing that you have only a set amount of time will motivate you to get something down. Check out the Ruby Sprint Schedule, which runs during our annual Winter Writing Festival.

7. Reward yourself – In a business where you don’t receive a regular paycheck, it’s important to recognize your accomplishments. Did you finish a particularly rough scene? Dip into your stash of chocolate. Did you meet your writing goals for the day? Walk the dog or watch the next movie in your Netflix queue. These little rewards go a long way in helping you make big progress.

Now it’s your turn!

Your Assignment: Identify at least one thing you can do to better manage your writing time. Write it in the comment section below. Then, DO IT!

This is Part 8 of the Ruby Slippered Sisterhood’s series, Write On 2017! A Writer’s Guide to Prioritizing, Goal Setting and Time Management. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7.

Shelley Coriell is an award-winning author of mysteries, romantic thrillers, and novels for teens. Her debut thriller was named one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of the Year, and her other novels have been nominated for an RT Reviewers’ Choice Award, Best Paperback Original of the Year from the International Thriller Writers, and a Kirkus Recommended Read. A former magazine editor and restaurant reviewer, Shelley lives in Arizona with her family and the world’s neediest rescue weimaraner. You can find her at www.shelleycoriell.com and Twittering @ShelleyCoriell.

Write On 2017! – Money, Money

WARNING: Today’s topic in our Write On 2017! series is NOT sexy. My apologies in advance. But here’s a cute weimaraner puppy for your viewing pleasure.

In this series we’re exploring ways to keep you on course and on fire about your writing, stuff like missions and visions and goals that fuel our writerly souls. Today is all about spreadsheets.

If you’re serious about the craft and business of writing, you need to invest in yourself and your products. And if you’re earning revenue, you must keep track of earnings. Uncle Sam agrees. I am not an accountant or tax professional, and I am not offering any financial or tax advice. My goal is to encourage you to be aware of your expenses and revenue streams, even if you are just starting out. Why? Money motivates. 🙂

Your #1 Assignment: Identify expenses for 2017.

On a spreadsheet or good ol’ yellow legal pad, record anticipated expenses. At year’s end, record actual expenses. Expenses can include: professional associations; education; craft books and comps; office supplies and equipment; book services such as editing, formatting, etc.; postage; bank fees; publicity; travel and lodging; networking functions; self-employment taxes; etc.

The benefits: Setting aside money for craft books or writing workshops will encourage you to work on your craft. Going to conferences will expose you to industry professionals such as agents, editors, cover artists, etc. Your tax adviser can also talk to you about deductions. Finally, putting figures down on paper is a statement of serious intent. Yay, you!

Your #2 Assignment: Identify income for 2017.

On that same spreadsheet, identify potential revenue streams such as royalties, advances, speaking honorariums, freelance work, etc. As money comes in, record it.

The benefits: You might identify some unexpected revenue streams. In addition, it’s cause to celebrate. Millions of people talk about “writing a book”, a tiny percentage of those actually do it, and a minuscule number of that subset make any money off their writing. This is a tough biz, my friends, and I applaud all of you who have earned money from it!

While budgeting isn’t too sexy, finding ways to empower our writing is. In the comment section below, tell us about one great investment you’ve made in your writing career. Might be a craft book, research trip, conference, or whiz-bang website. Write on!

This is Part 6 of the Ruby Slippered Sisterhood’s series, Write On 2017! A Writer’s Guide to Prioritizing, Goal Setting and Time Management. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5.

Shelley Coriell is an award-winning author of mysteries, romantic thrillers, and novels for teens. Her debut thriller was named one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of the Year, and her other novels have been nominated for an RT Reviewers’ Choice Award, Best Paperback Original of the Year from the International Thriller Writers, and a Kirkus Recommended Read. A former magazine editor and restaurant reviewer, Shelley lives in Arizona with her family and the world’s neediest rescue weimaraner. You can find her at www.shelleycoriell.com and Twittering @ShelleyCoriell.

Write On 2017! – Goal Setting

Today we’re getting to the heart of any writing plan: Goals. Goals drive us, inspire us, frustrate us, but ultimately transform us from dreamers into doers.

If you’ve joined us for the past three Wednesdays for the Ruby’s Write On 2017! series, you developed an inspiring mission, created a forward-focused vision, and took a candid look at your strengths and weaknesses. You are now ready for the serious and empowering work of goal setting. 

Up first, SMART Goals. These are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely.  YOU control these goals. In the bookish world, there is so much we can’t control: rejections from agents and editors, bad reviews, Amazon algorithms. With SMART goals you have the power. Embrace it. Celebrate it. Use it! Some examples:

Not-So Smart Goal: Get an agent.

SMART Goal: Send out five agent queries every month. 

Not-So Smart Goal: Make $10,000 with my self-published series.

SMART Goal: Make the first book in my self-pub series perma-free.

Now on to Long-Term Goals. For our purposes, these are Big Dreams or goals that spark or fuel your writerly fire. They do not have to be SMART or within your control. They are often lofty and speak to people, places, and ideas beyond the writerly self. An example of a long-term goal: Be a keynote speaker at a major writing conference or reader event. 

Your #1 Assignment: Determine your SMART goals for 2017.

We’re not looking at weekly word count goals or to-do lists. With this assignment I want you to put some serious brain cells into determining what you want to accomplish by the end of the year. For some of you, that might be a single line:

  •  Finish MY NOVEL (70,000 words)

Those of you who like check boxes and are motivated by completing tasks might have gloriously long lists that address everything from productivity to promotion to professional affiliations. Your lists might look something like:

  • Revise NOVEL #3 (80,000 word historical)
  • Query NOVEL #3 to 10 first-tier agents
  • Write and self-pub NOVELLA #1 (35,000 word cozy mystery)
  • Write short story and sub to online magazine
  • Fast draft NOVEL #4 (60,000-word young adult) during NaNoWriMo
  • Hire development editor to edit NOVEL #2
  • Renew writer association memberships: RWA, Sisters in Crime; SCBWI
  • Blog once a month on group blog
  • Enter NOVEL #3 in two writing contests
  • Attend San Diego State University’s Writers Conference  or RWA National (writer event)
  • Attend Tucson Festival of Books or Romantic Times Convention (reader event)
  • Take on-line class on How To Write Believable Characters
  • Give mini program at local RWA meeting
  • Read and apply one craft book: Donald Maass’s THE FIRE IN FICTION
  • Revamp website to make mobile responsive
  • Increase newsletter subscribers by 10 percent
  • Go on writing retreat with critique partner
  • Find three beta readers
  • Create marketing plan for NOVELLA #1
  • Whew…but you get the idea!

Regardless of the number of SMART goals, these goals must SERVE you. To that end, review them at least quarterly. In addition, don’t be afraid to tweak or obliterate your goals, especially if you have significant personal or professional shifts.

Your #2 Assignment: Determine your long-term “goals”.

Have some fun with this one. Dream and plan big. Unlike SMART goals, long-term goals might not change every year, if ever. Here are a few examples taken from my personal Long-Term Goal list:

  • Use my writing to travel and meet new people and go new places
  • Support my editor and agent in pursuit of their professional goals
  • Inspire my three daughters to follow and fight for their dreams

In the comment section below, list some of your writing goals for 2017. I’d LOVE to see some of your lofty, dreamy Long-Term Goals. Write on!

This is Part 5 of the Ruby Slippered Sisterhood’s series, Write On 2017! A Writer’s Guide to Prioritizing, Goal Setting and Time Management. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4.

Shelley Coriell is an award-winning author of mysteries, romantic thrillers, and novels for teens. Her debut thriller was named one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of the Year, and her other novels have been nominated for an RT Reviewers’ Choice Award, Best Paperback Original of the Year from the International Thriller Writers, and a Kirkus Recommended Read. A former magazine editor and restaurant reviewer, Shelley lives in Arizona with her family and the world’s neediest rescue weimaraner. You can find her at www.shelleycoriell.com and Twittering @ShelleyCoriell.

Next Page »

The Latest Comments

  • Ann Edall-Robson: Laying under the slicker, Emi wrapped her body as best as she could around Marc to keep him warm....
  • Panthera: Thank you all. This is the second part to what is supposed to be a five part series of short stories. All...
  • Elisa Beatty: Wooot!!! Delighted to hear it, Lyn!!
  • Elisa Beatty: Stick with it, Liz!! You’ve got this!!
  • Elisa Beatty: Oh, a writing retreat on Kiawah Island!! That sounds like a dream!!

Archives