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Posts tagged with: inspiration

A Picture Paints A Thousand Words (I Hope!)

People always ask where I get my story ideas. It’s a complicated question…and yet it isn’t. Because they never come from any one place. Sometimes an article I read on the internet will get the wheels turning. Sometimes an overheard conversation sparks something. And sometimes it’s a picture.Lane 10

A picture like this one. 

My son went snow tubing with friends this past winter. When he came back, he had several pictures. This was one of them. I chuckled and told him his facial expression seemed a little sinister. But as I looked closer, I caught a little flash of red just behind him. A small marker that said Lane 10. And there it was. The idea and title for a new book. A thriller. One where something terrible happens on Lane 10.

Right now that’s all it is. The smallest kernel of an idea. But once I get a chance, I plan to explore it just a little more. And hopefully, one day, that photo will give birth to a brand new book–painting not just a thousand words, but tens of thousands of words.

And there you have it. Short and sweet. I would love to hear your thoughts!

If you’re an author, do you have an interesting story about where you got one of your ideas? If you’re a reader, have you ever read a book and wondered how on earth the writer came up with the plot?

Consolation Day 2015

Silent PhoneA few days ago (March 26th, to be exact), calls went out to several dozen very talented writers and authors in the romance community. I’m pretty sure this is not news to you.

That same day, hundreds of folks who had entered did not receive a call. I admit, I was one of those. Woe is me. If you’re stopping by here today, I’m guessing you may have been one of those waiting by the phone, disappointed when it didn’t ring (or it rang, but it was a telemarketer or family member or someone else equally unaware of how the ringing of the phone on that particular day can make your blood pressure skyrocket).

But after the phone call never came, and I commiserated with my friends, and I had a lovely cocktail (or two) with my husband that night, I picked myself up and wrote this post—because I know the healing power of venting (in a civilized, non-attacking way). I love this annual Ruby tradition because it reminds me that I’m not alone. There are so many of us striving for the brass ring, trying to get ahead and have our talents recognized.

Oh, and I love this tradition because I get to give away PRIZES! Fabulous, healing, nurturing, monetary or delicious prizes!

Finding the Aha Moments

Last week, for about the twelfth time, I found myself befuddled up to my eyeballs over a romantic suspense work in progress. Whether you’re a panster, like myself, or a plotter, at some point you could find fresh ideas hiding in the deepest, darkness recesses of your mind amongst a pile of crappy overused ideas. When this happened to me in the past, I’d walked around for days mulling over my problem, my plot’s direction, which is perfectly fine, if you don’t have a deadline and or have time to waste. This time I purchased a few books (Snap: Seizing Your AHA Moments by Katherine Ramsland and Your Creative Brain by Shelly Carson, PHD) and learned for one that mulling is an acceptable process to release your muse. What I also learned, so far, that the more tricks you use to open the gates the faster that will happen.

We’re like the grains of sand on a pearly white beach. Besides having the potential to be stuck in places we really don’t want to go, we’re totally awesome and unique and we all learn in different ways. And in combination of ways.

It’s alleged that we have seven mind-sets (seven ways of learning and using our minds): Absorb Brainset, Envision Brainset, Connect Brainset, Reason Brainset, Evaluate Brainset, Transform Brainset, and Stream Brainset. I’m not going to divulge every detail I’ve learned from these books so far. I suggest you check them out for yourself.  However, I will share a concise description of each mindset and an exercise you can use that key to unlock your mind’s muse.

Absorb Mindset: Ability to absorb new information in a non-judgmental way to be stored for use later when you can use say information to see associations between objects and to remain open to your subconscious.  

Exercise: Pick a space, indoor or outside. For five minutes, really absorb your surroundings. Notice the colors, textures, lines and shadows.  Then touch, listen, smell and taste. Next pick an object and think of a new way use for it. We’ve all seen the Knorr Side Dish commercial where a cork screw is used as a coat nail and a fork is used a cabinet handle. That is the same idea.

Envision Mindset:  In this mindset we deliberately imagine ways to solve problems, using absorb information. This mindset is well known to creative people.  The exercise below will help you increase your mental imagery. It turns off the stream of unwanted thoughts.

Exercise: Close your eyes and take three deep cleansing breathes. Now image your happy place. Where you feel the most relax? Picture yourself there. Allow yourself to feel the surroundings. If your recliner, feel the texture of the material against your skin, the firmness of the cushion surrounding you, the angle of your body as you relax. Are there sounds around you? Soft music or maybe a ball game on the T.V., or your children playing at your feet.  How about smells, tastes.  Allow yourself to enjoy your happy place for a few minutes.

Connect Mindset:  This mindset allows you to spawn many ideas without concerns to how they will play out. You’ll think out of the box. Successful use of this mindset could lead you to become overwhelmed with creative possible ideas. You’ll become energized and excited about your work.

Exercise: Set a timer for three minutes. On a piece of paper write down as many uses for a shoe you can think of. Then set the timer again and write down all the things you can do with a shoelace. Set the timer again and jot down the consequences of a torn shoelace.

Reason Brainset: This brainset solves problems logically, using all your storage memories and knowledge. It allows you to control what thoughts occupy your mind. It is deliberate and necessary as you complete your creative project. It is the perfect mindset to flesh out a whimsical idea and make it realistic. It helps you motivate action, manage time, increases chances for success, strengthens self-confidence and heightens sense of control over your life. It’s one mindset I’ve consciously worked on every single day, several times a day, over the last several months.

Exercise: You will stop particular unwanted thoughts or train of thoughts as soon as they enter you mind by simply saying, “Don’t go there.” Or “Thinking of this is not my on my hour’s agenda.”

Evaluate Mindset: Coming up with fresh ideas is vital is our line of work, but judging whether those ideas are indeed worth spending time one is also essential. This is where this mindset comes in. Three factors are necessary: active judgement, focused attention and impersonality. We need to judge our work against others of which it’s competing. Not us against them. This is about our work, not ourselves. In order to do that, we need to get some distance from our work, judge it with respect, don’t toss the work mid-project, look at each of its parts and evaluate their merits, and look at the work from the point of view of your audience. Be flexible. Consult others. Be hard on your work and not yourself!

Exercise: On a sheet of paper write the titles of your top ten books of all time.  Imagine they’re no longer available anywhere or ever again. Now, ( I know you’re going to hate me)  cross off five. Behind them, write why you crossed them off.

Transform Mindset:  Is all about emotion. Our emotion. Our negative emotions and how they affect our memories and visions. It’s important we know this mindset and how it disturbs our creativity. It is a what-if state, just like the envision mindset, but unlike the purposeful imaginings of the later, this mindset’s themes are worry, anxiety, self-pity or regret.  But this mindset can help with your creative project. Our characters are an extension of humanity.  People have flaws, negative thoughts, regrets. We can use this mindset to write timeless characters if only we draw on the transform mindset.

Exercise: Pick three things in your home that you feel best represents you: personality, taste, qualities. Now write a paragraph about each and how they relate to you. Did you learn anything about yourself? Was there a negative or positive view of yourself?

The Stream Mindset: We refer to this mindset as being in ‘the zone.’ It is the unique melding of self and action. You lose your sense of self and focus on the world at hand. But how do we achieve this mindset.

First, you need the expertise to enter the stream mindset. Second, you need to be engaged in an activity that intrinsically motivating you. (Intrinsic motivation means that you’re involved in an activity because of an internal award and not an external one.) Do you write for the joy of writing?

Exercise: On a piece of paper jot down five activities that had your blood surging and your mind whirling. These activities are your passion.

 

As I said at the beginning of this blog, I’ve only touched on the information contained in these two books. In fact, I’m not finished with either of them, but what I’ve learned so far has helped me to be more productive, to think out of the box on my wip, and be more acceptable of the amount of work I can accomplish in a day.

Catch Your Muse & Win a Pot of Gold

big-shamrockHappy St. Patrick’s Day everyone! Do you have your green on? This fun holiday has a number of myths associated with it, one being the elusive Leprechaun. Considered a fairy who likes to cause mischief, yet also brings luck and riches, this little fellow has the makings of a great literary muse.9muses

Originally a Muse was any of the nine sister goddesses in Greek mythology presiding over song and poetry and the arts and sciences. The term has come to mean “a source of inspiration, especially: a guiding genius.” (Merriam-Webster)

 Well, I don’t know about you, but I could ALWAYS use a guiding genius! And so I employ ways to lure my elusive muse to help me write. Everyone’s muse is personal and unique (like your writer’s voice). I envision my muse as female, a strong Amazon-type warrior like Xena Warrior Princess.

Xena

 

When I fought (and beat the crap out of) ovarian cancer, my muse wore teal-colored leather and battled with grit and precision every day with her razor-sharp spear (okay, I was on some pretty nifty drugs during that time). Today she is still tough and wears way more leather than me, but she seems to be a bit more elusive now that my days of obsessing about survival are (hopefully) a thing of the past.

Now I call upon my muse to help me write historical paranormal and YA paranormal romances. And despite my love of writing and a desire to create tantalizing hooks, amazing worlds, and emotion-provoking characters, my muse sometimes fails to show up. I’m left alone, staring at the last sentence I wrote with hundreds of blank pages left to fill. Oh Muse, Muse, wherefore art thou Muse?!

I try to coax her out of hiding. I beg her for just a pinch of inspiration, a quirky description, a perfect line, something to get me going again. And then one of my kids yells “Mom, where’s the…?” and my muse vanishes like a dandelion puff in a tornado.

Over the years I have developed a few techniques to create the muse-alluring rainbow. And on lucky days, I can find her and her inspiration (aka, her pot of gold).

1. Clear my desk. I can’t think about my WIP when there are bills piled next to my computer or kid permission slips or my list of a million little things that need to happen. The clutter pulls my attention away from the book and my muse refuses to waste her time coming near me.Eleri

2. Make a cup of chai latte. I’ve addicted my muse to hot chai lattes. I make them at home to save on cost and limit them for the calories. But if I’m stuck and am desperately seeking the end of the rainbow, the spicy taste of cinnamon mixed with hot milk, black tea and cardamom really entices her out of hiding. I now save them for the time when I know I will be writing.

3. Find my playlist. At the beginning of a new book I create a musical playlist with songs that represent the time period and songs that help me understand the characters (which is why my iPhone has both Gregorian monks chanting and Eminem). I don’t listen to music every day, but when my muse is playing hard to get, the music lures her in like the Pied Piper.

Gregorian-Voices Eminem

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Cut and paste. I’m very visually oriented, so I like to see what I’m writing about. Consequently I collage my stories, or at least the characters and settings. At the beginning of a new project, I take a day or two to look up pictures of places and people, print them off and glue them to poster board, manila folders or blank books. I actually brainstorm this way, discovering backstory and plot details in fun or creative images. My muse loves my collages so I prop them up in my line of sight (on my clean desk) when I write.CrH collage

 

 5. I walk. There is something about fresh air and rushing blood that gets my creative energy sparking. If I dwell on a scene while walking, dialogue pops into my head. It is almost like my muse is skipping along, flicking ideas at me until I grasp one and we run with it. By the time I get home I’m usually itching to start typing.

walking 

 We all have a muse, our inspiration for creating art, expressing our ideas, and molding something beautiful out of lifeless material. She or he is a one-of-a-kind personal guide to finding our pot of gold. You just need to lure her in and grab on.

What are some ways you find inspiration to create your art? What lures your muse out of hiding?

 

 

You. Your Life. Your Writing.

My children came into the world with two sets of grandparents and two sets of great-grandparents.  Safe within the nurturing embrace of their large and loving family, they thrived.

I can’t recall whether Son was in kindergarten or first grade, but one day, he arrived home confused and agitated.  A classmate claimed to have no grandparents.  How could that be?

The shattering of normal had begun. 

This is one of my favorite memes (sorry, Angelica, but Carolyn will always be Morticia to me).  In one pithy sentence, the truth is revealed:  Normal isn’t a wide brush that coats every life with the same paint.  It’s a series of brushes comprised of various materials, camel hair, boar bristles, razor wire, each a different width and bearing a different color.

We’ve all heard or read about that mystical, magical, elusive element called Voice.  From whence does it come?  How do I get it?

The answer is simple.  As you experience life, you acquire streaks, stripes, and spots of matte, satin, gloss, and glitter.  It’s from that chromatic chaos tinting the neutral base of your inherent nature Voice emerges.

Voice is you–who you were, are, and even who you will become.  If planning your next visit to an exotic land is your normal, that adventurous spirit will traipse across the page.  A perennial optimist?  Sunshine will light your words.  Pessimist?  Gloom will shadow your prose.  Try though you might to disguise it, Voice will illuminate the real you.

Have things in your world ever become so overwhelming you wanted to divorce your life?  Okay, maybe not divorce, but how about a legal separation?  Or, at the very least, a lengthy vacation?

Life will, eventually, test every hope, dream, belief, and perception, pushing you to the edge of your mental and physical endurance.  It will leave you asea, battling crashing waves, glowering skies, and circling sharks.  Survival will demand all your attention.  Day by day, you’ll struggle, hope for rescue, search the horizon for signs of land.

This becomes your normal.

Then, for better or worse, it will change.  You’ll look back and either be relieved to have washed ashore or nostalgic for storm clouds because the sun is baking your brain.

Here’s the thing:  As much as you curse what- or whoever tossed you overboard, there are things to be learned within your circumstances.  Without these lessons, your stories will lack depth, credibility, and empathy.

Your Voice will lack resonance for your reader.

(Just for the record, the same holds true for joy and other aspects of living.  Trials, however, seem to sharpen the learning curve.)

Authors, and their work, mature and grow within the framework of each individual’s normal.  The frames are all different and constantly changing.  Some are heavy and gilded, some thin strips of salvaged wood.  Time can strip the gilding, embellish the wood, but within the frame, Voice, although evolving, remains unique.

Thus, I encourage you to reevaluate your normal, the joys, trials, and general messiness of living.

Accept it.  Embrace it.  Learn from it.

Put it to work.

The vanquished is always servant–or, in the fly’s case, dinner–to the victor. 

 

You, Your Life, Your Writing.

When my children were born, they had two sets of grandparents and two sets of great-grandparents.  They thought nothing of it, safe within the nurturing embrace of a large and loving family.

I can’t recall whether Son was in kindergarten or first grade, but one day, he arrived home confused and agitated.  He’d discovered a classmate had no grandparents at all.  How could that be?

The shattering of normal had begun. 

This is one of my favorite memes (Sorry, Angelica, but Carolyn will always be Morticia to me).  In one pithy sentence, the truth is revealed; normal isn’t a wide brush that coats every life with the same paint.  It’s a slue of brushes made of various materials, camel hair, boar bristle, razor wire, of varying widths, each bringing a different color to the mix.

We’ve all heard or read about that mystical, elusive element called Voice.  From whence does it come?  How do I get it?

The answer is simple.  You live, experience, and grow, gathering slashes, stripes, and spots of matte, satin, gloss, and glitter.  It’s from that chromatic chaos tinting the neutral base of your inherent nature that Voice comes.

Voice is you–who you were, are, and even who you will become—and it relates back to your perception of normal.

Have things in your world ever become so overwhelming you wanted to divorce your life?  Okay, maybe not divorce, but how about a legal separation?  Or, at the very least, a lengthy vacation?

Life will, eventually, test every hope, dream, belief, and perception, pushing you to the edge of your mental and physical endurance, leaving you asea amid crashing waves, glowering skies, and circling sharks.  Survival demands all your attention.  The water, clouds, and sharks become the center of your world.  Day by day, you struggle, scan the horizon for land, search the sky for rescue.

The sea has become your normal.

Then, for better or worse, it changes.  You look back, either relieved to have washed ashore or hoping the clouds will return since the sun is now baking your brain.

Here’s the thing:  As much as you curse what- or whoever threw you overboard, every situation is fraught with things you should learn (especially about yourself).  Without them, your stories will lack depth, credibility, empathy, and resonance.

Your Voice will have no conduit with which to reach and touch your readers.

(Just for the record, the same can hold true life’s more pleasant things.  Trial, however, seems to sharpen the learning curve.)

Just like children, authors, and their work, mature, growing and changing within their frame of normal.  The frames are all different.  Some heavy and gilded, some thin strips of salvaged wood.  Time can strip the gilding, embellish the salvaged wood, but within the frame, the Voice remains unique.

Thus, I encourage you to reevaluate your normal, the joys, trials, and general messiness that comes with living.

Accept it.  Embrace it.  Learn from it.

Put it to work.

The vanquished is always at the mercy of the victor.

 

 

Authors On Writing

Thoughts on writing from authors I thought you would enjoy.

Set your sights high, the higher the better. Expect the most wonderful things to happen, not in the future but right now. Realize that nothing is too good. Allow absolutely nothing to hamper you or hold you up in any way. ~ Eileen Caddy

If you don’t go after what you want, you’ll never have it. If you don’t ask, the answer is always no. If you don’t step forward, you’re always in the same place. ~ Nora Roberts

Keep a diary and one day it’ll keep you. ~Mae West

A person who publishes a book willfully appears before the populace with his pants down. ~Edna St. Vincent Millay

When things don’t go your way – change your way. ~ Me

The best time for planning a book is while you’re doing the dishes. ~Agatha Christie

I think it’s bad to talk about one’s present work, for it spoils something at the root of the creative act. It discharges the tension. ~Norman Mailer

If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten,  either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.   – Benjamin Franklin

Some of us aren’t meant to belong. Some of us have to turn the world upside down and shake the hell out of it until we make our own place in it. ~ Elizabeth Lowell

Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart. ~William Wordsworth

Easy reading is damn hard writing. ~Nathaniel Hawthorne

I love writing. I love the swirl and swing of words as they tangle with human emotions. ~James Michener

Women with clean houses do not have finished books. ~ Joy Held

All my best thoughts were stolen by the ancients. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

People do not deserve to have good writing, as they are so pleased with bad. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

It took me fifteen years to discover that I had no talent for writing, but I couldn’t give it up because by that time I was too famous.  ~ Robert Benchley

I’m not a very good writer, but I’m an excellent rewriter. ~ James Michener

When you get to the point everyone else would quit –keep going. ~ Unknown.

Tell the readers a story. Because without a story, you are merely using words to prove you can string them together in logical sentences.  – Anne McCaffrey

The role of a writer is not to say what we all can say, but what we are unable to say.- Anads Nin

The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug. – Mark Twain

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great. ~ Mark Twain

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary—it’s just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences. ~ Somerset Maugham

Good writing is supposed to evoke sensation in the reader -not the fact that it is raining, but the feeling of being rained upon. ~ E. L. Doctorow

Writing is like prostitution. First you do it for love, and then for a few close friends, and then for money.~ Moliere

I try to leave out the parts that people skip. ~Elmore Leonard

When asked, “How do you write?” I invariably answer, “one word at a time.” ~ Stephen King

If you don’t have the time to read, you don’t have the time or the tools to write. ~ Stephen King

There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.~ Ernest Hemingway

It’s none of their business that you have to learn to write. Let them think you were born that way. ~ Ernest Hemingway

Rejection is not Fatal ~ Author Unknown

Now go and write.

Forget the guilt, -“Guilt: the gift that keeps on giving.”Erma Bombeck

Forget the housework. -“Housework, if it is done properly, can cause brain damage.” Erma Bombeck

Don’t worry about your family.-“No one ever died from sleeping in an unmade bed.” Erma Bombeck

Enjoy the moment.- “Just think of all those women on the Titanic who said, ‘No thank you’ to desert that night. And for what?!” Erma Bombeck

 

Please share your favorite quote.

 

Rita writes sexy stories about Military Heroines. Extraordinary women and the men they love. 

Finding my Muse – in England?

Hopefully you are all logging on to read this fabulous ruby slippered sisterhood blog because of the constantly helpful tips and inspiration and not because your muse is still snuggled in bed. I must admit that earlier this summer, when I began the third book in my Scottish historical romance series, my muse was rebelling like a werewolf being trussed up in 16th century stays – very ugly. Part of the problem definitely had to do with me just having written the first three chapters of a contemporary YA paranormal for my agent to submit. My internal dialogue included words like “massive” and “epic fail”. Not very Henry Tudor.

When I had to shift immediately into the 16th century, my muse was…not amused -LOL! Luckily I had already purchased plane tickets and had planned a trip to England and Scotland where history permeates the very air you breathe. In between packing and mapping my upcoming route through the countryside, I rewrote the first seventy pages of my 16th century WIP three times and still wasn’t happy with it. Ugh! Surely I could convince my muse to wake up and help me in Britain.

My family and I landed in London after an all-night, no-sleep flight and pushed ourselves to stay awake. So despite standing beside the infamous white tower in the Tower of London and listening to French school children learn about Anne Boleyn being beheaded (Je crois que) right where I stood, my muse wasn’t all that impressed. That might have had something to do with my three exhausted, whining kids (ages 6, 12 and 14) who were also dragging behind me.

The White Tower in London

The White Tower in London

On to Hampton Court Palace the next day, my oldest daughter and I were able to run off by ourselves to explore Henry VIII’s kitchen and the incredible gardens. Since I had just finished writing my second Highland Hearts novel, which takes place at Hampton Court, this was thrilling. Luckily I hadn’t gotten anything wrong in the details, but just being there, walking the halls, touching the walls, got my heart pounding and my muse raised an inquisitive brow and put down her iPhone.

That night my family and I made it to our rental cottage on a farm in the lovely Coltswold village of South Cerney. It was like stepping into a fairytale with sheep and horses all around the stone cottage covered with climbing roses where it sat on a duck-filled lake. Walking paths led us through woods and meadows, along canals and under ancient-looking arched stone trestles. Neighbors meandered the footpaths with their dogs and trees bent over creating a shaded vault cathedral of leaves.

Heather & Kids under Coltswold bridge

Heather & Kids under Coltswold bridge

One morning I escaped the family to stroll the footpaths alone.  A light breeze blew, sheep bleated in the pastures and the sun shone in a blue sky above the flittering leaves. The beauty and serenity in the peaceful landscape filled me up until I was smiling outright, a silly grin of pure happiness. I roamed the countryside, watching new varieties of birds and studying the wild flowers and branched bushes trained to twine into fences along the road. And as soon as I got back to the cottage, I made some tea and sat down to write.

I wrote about the details of my new setting, this bit of heaven so d

ifferent from my American suburbia with its snaking sidewalks and rushing minivans. I felt full to bursting to write. My muse was whispering in my ear and willing to put on any period costume I wanted.

4-sisters tree in S. Cerney

4-sisters tree in S. Cerney

What I realized then was that it wasn’t so much that I was in England that I could suddenly write. It was that I was filled up again. With what? Hmmm…I’m not sure exactly. Creativity, peace, inner strength and beauty. Whatever it is, we need it as writers. This is what woos our muse into creating our art.

Think about it. When you are stressed out with time lines, with children or parents or siblings pulling at you, with those gray rocks of annoyance or dread like unpaid bills or illness or loss – you become drained, empty. You have nothing to give, no juice within you to ink your pen, to pour into your manuscript. The well dries out and your muse collapses on a dusty, pebbled road with vultures circling overhead. Quite sad.

Going to London didn’t wake up my muse. Touring Hampton Court gave her a drink. But it wasn’t until I walked in the exquisitely quaint landscape of the Coltswolds that my muse revived, drank fully, and smiled with that twinkle in her eye. The great Tower of London had authentic details that I will remember, but in order for me to write I had to refill my creative well.

Sheep Sheep Everywhere!

Sheep Sheep Everywhere!

I spent the next few days site seeing as well as resting under the magical trees and roses at the farm. We saw Bath, Stonehenge, Avebury, the Harry Potter studios, and Cirencester. But it was the cup of tea on the back patio watching the baby ducks and the cranes on the water that made me want to grab my journal and pen.

This is good news for you and for me. Why? Because this means that you don’t have to travel across the ocean to wake up your grumpy or thirsty muse. Yes, it helps to be immersed in the details you will be writing about, but even with the details, if you don’t fill up the well, nothing will come out on paper. And you can fill up the well here at home. You just need to find some peace, breathe, and explore your world until your muse becomes hydrated again. Here are a few ways I hope to fill my well here at home.

  1. Find new walking paths around my town to take my dog on.
  2. Visit the rose gardens in the town next to me.
  3. Visit the art museum and stare at art until my muse either becomes inspired or swoons from boredom.
  4. Investigate the quaint little shops in my own town while trying not to spend money.
  5. Find a tea shop that serves tea and scones. There’s got to be one around here.
  6. Make tea each day in my own tea pot at home and enjoy a biscuit with it.
  7. Sit on my screened porch and watch the birds swoop or thunderstorms roll in.
  8. Go camping or hiking or to the beach.
  9. Lay on a blanket under the oak in my backyard (with heavy clothes on to keep the mosquitos from eating me alive).
  10. Lay on that same blanket with my hubby watching the stars (nudge, nudge, say no more ; )

The next time you’ve lost touch with your muse, don’t feel like you have to travel the world looking for her. If she’s coughing up dust balls there are ways to revive her right in your own little corner of the globe. Fill yourself up. Only then will you have the creative juice to fill pages with your words.

What are some ways you wake up your muse?

Light in the Darkness

DEADLY BONDS, the third book in my romantic suspense Mindhunters series released today (hooray!). But rather than blog about the dark, chilling world of serial killers (as much as I enjoy writing villains), I’d like to focus on happier things. After all, despite the ominous vibes, my books are ultimately about hope and resilience. Light over darkness. Rainbows and puppies.

Okay, maybe you won’t find that last one in my books. But even in my characters’ dark world, light prevails and love conquers all.

Ruby Release: Finding Her Rhythm by Dani Wade

One of the joys of my Indie-publishing endeavors is being able to write a book how it wants to be written– let the characters lead me and follow them without restraints (or into restraints, if that’s where they want to go). My editors have led my Harlequin books in great directions, strengthening them and my skills. But there are just certain things Harlequin books don’t do. So Indie publishing lets me explore different aspects of my creativity.

In this case, I was able to follow the leading of my hero – my rock star hero.

Danielle_FindingHer

When I first envisionsed Michael Korvello, little voices nagged at me. There’s a long-held rumor that editors don’t want Rock Stars. They aren’t popular enough. But still he hung around – that bad boy, brooding rocker attracted to the anti-thesis of his high profile lifestyle, his nanny.

I just couldn’t get him out of my mind, and before long, despite the push and pull of my first print release and new proposals, I had the full-blown story of a man who was lonely but afraid of revealing his true nature. And a woman so battered by life that trust had been all but obliterated – especially for a first rate performer.

So I chose to follow my characters and discovered a world beneath a world. The performer who wants to be seen and loved as a real man. A family who misses him. A woman who learns to trust him to protect her. A brother who teases and torments him, but who always has his back – on and off the road.

They took me on a journey and I enjoyed every minute! (Well, until I reached revisions.) A journey of a family trying to find each other again, and a man hell bent on using his sexual talents to teach a woman everything that she’s capable of, and everything they can be together.

So let’s celebrate those fun journeys we get to take when we follow wherever our characters lead! Share the last “fun” discovery you made about your book/characters while writing!

One commenter will win a giftie! An Amazon or B&N giftcard for a new journey of discovery.

Dani

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The Latest Comments

  • Arlene Hittle: Sounds great!
  • Gwyn: Reading the premise made me smile, Vivi. Sounds like a winner!
  • Anne Marie Becker: Looks like a great book! Congratulations on the new release!
  • Elizabeth Essex: What a delightful premise. Can’t wait to read it! Congrats on your release Vivi/Lizzie!...
  • jbrayweber: Sounds like a fun book, Vivi! Congrats on the new release!

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