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Posts tagged with: Feng Shui

Tapping into Feng Shui for Success

Feng Shui centers around the concept that there is a powerful flow of energy around your home and workplace which affects your life. Feng means “the force of wind” and Shui means “the flow of water” in Chinese. Practioners of Feng Shui feel that this living energy can flow or stagnate, causing success or problems in all areas of your life. The art of Feng Shui works to manipulate this energy flow in order to improve your health and success.

So if you feel like you’re not getting ahead in your personal life or in your career, making a few changes in your home or work area may help balance the energies and open up a window to success. Feng Shui can be very complex. Below are a few simple ways to encourage energy flow around you which should calm and balance your writing muse.

  • Clear the clutter from your workspace. Clutter trips up the free energy flow around you, so try to feng-shui-office[1]take a few minutes each day before you dive into your manuscript to throw out the uneeded and file away those pesky papers around you.
  • Ideally, you should face the door of the room where you are working. If you can’t, place a mirror before you that reflects the doorway. Facing the doorway is a power position.
  • Bring a live houseplant into your area to “breathe” life into your work, but if it starts to die, get it out of there quickly. A little bamboo plant is easy to bamboo-house-plantcare for and will do the trick.
  • To invite wealth and prosperity into your home, put nine coins (any denomination) in a red envelope (color a white one red if needed), tape it shut and place it under the welcome mat at your front door. Also place at other doors if you use several entrances.

asian_new_year_red_envelope8[1]

  • Use color – there is a ton of information on color with Feng Shui. Red and purple are strong colors associated with prosperity and fame. Keeping a red pillow or purple candle in the far left-hand corner of your workspace will encourage wealth and prosperity. I painted the inside of the doors to my computer cubby red so that red surrounded me while I wrote. About a year later I got published. Just saying…: )
  • Keep a nourishing view. If you look up from typing and literally see a brick wall, that explains why you’ve felt stuck (or it’s just that your characters refuse to follow your plot). Hang a pleasant picture or move to a spot near an unobstructed window.
  • Repair or replace broken objects as they block the flow of energy. Change burnt out light bulbs and batteries in dead clocks. Remove chipped or cracked objects from your work space.
  • Light is an important source of energy. If you work in a room without natural light, paint the walls yellow and make sure there are enough lamps to give a glow to the room. Mirrors placed about the room can also help move the energy and give the room a lighter appearance.master-ws055[1]Put marble tables and red sofas on Craig’s List. They are not considered good for careers as they pull work stress and obstacles into the space.  Hmmm…I guess I’m glad my dog ate part of my red couch so I had to get a new one (couch, not dog).
  • Stay away from Feng Shui arrows. Arrows are elements that disrupt positive energy flow, such as pointy architectural objects or stair cases or mirrors pointed at your bed. Don’t write under a stair case (maybe this is why Harry Potter didn’t become an author – LOL!) or under slanted, irregular walls. Even a straight road leading right to your front door can be an arrow. To disrupt the negative effects of arrows, place a wind chime or hanging plant or decoration in the way.

These are just a few fun tips to help bring positive energy into our writing lives. For vastly more information check out Feng Shui on the web, in bookstores, and libraries or consult your favorite Feng Shui master.

Have a prosperous, peace-filled, productive day : ) Heather

 

The Latest Comments

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