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Meet 2014 Golden Heart Finalist Marni Folsom!

Today we’re delighted to welcome Marni Folsom (one of my 2012 Firebird sisters!!), who’s a Golden Heart Finalist again in 2014 with her Paranormal Romance BEYOND THE FIRE.

Marni was born in Colorado and bopped all over the Southwest growing up. She spent her undergrad years in Arizona and her graduate school years in Washington State. She’s since lived in California and Scotland, but always returned to the Seattle area where she thrives on easy access to cultural events, water, mountains, good coffee and new technologies. When not writing, she spends a lot of time eating scones, brewing homemade root beer, and chasing her two little book lovers through the mossy forest near their home.

Here’s a blurb for her Golden Heart book, BEYOND THE FIRE:

Kendra Harrison excels at running—from her past, from close relationships, from the man who killed her family—but she’s stopped in her tracks by a prophecy that she will save the world from ancient evil.

She laughs at the fairytale notion; if anyone knows the difference between fable and stark reality, it’s the sole survivor of a devastating arson attack. Then she meets a Demigod with anger management issues, watches a dead man drive a semi truck into her car, and dons a ring that transports her to a different place and time. If this is reality, it sucks…and if magic lives within her, why couldn’t she save her family from the fire all those years ago?

Ben Flannigan is a magical warrior, born to prevent the rise of a Pre-Celtic Demigod gone bad. He teams up with Kendra to fight fire with fire, and they produce a heat all their own. But Kendra doesn’t know how to keep her past from destroying her future. The weight of her life’s horrors has left her feeling tainted and unlovable. When the Gods who granted her power declared that the magnitude of her abilities required a personal sacrifice, Kendra cavalierly offered to sacrifice true love.

 Now, rescuing the world means losing the man who means the world to her.

Sounds awesome!!! Marni, I love the hint of humor in your voice in that blurb—something I always love to see in paranormal. Oh, Dreamweavers, you’re building me one heck of a hypothetical TBA pile (which I’m sure will be a real one before long)!

 Since Marni’s from Seattle, let’s all grab a cup of gourmet coffee and settle in for a chat!

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So, Marni, you’ve moved around a lot, but say the Seattle area keeps drawing you back. What’s the draw for you, and how does it impact your writing?

AuthorPhoto_2014_WebOur new-to-us house sits on a raging river at the edge of a national forest about 40 minutes east of Seattle. It’s a sublime location. I’m very much a city girl – I love the freeing beauty of anonymity combined with the heart-pounding pace of traffic and crowds – but flowing water, confident wildlife, the virile scent combination of damp earth and ferns roasting in pinpoint shafts of sunlight? That totally rocks, and it definitely influences my feelings as I write. The characters in my GH manuscript wield inherited magic, old elemental stuff that’s regenerated by a worldwide life energy called The Source. Their relationships to nature are incredibly important to their survival. When I sit on my deck to write, I let the teeming life of our surroundings feed the story. The river seethes across rocks and tree stumps and our local family of blue jays provides a staccato chirp-chatter that moves in time with my fingers clacking on the keyboard. Really, it’s just awesome.

*Swooning at the very thought*. That really does sound incredible—like you’re living in a writing retreat!! (Okay, chasing after two kids may kinda kill that vibe from time to time, but still…..) So that’s your external power-boost. What about internal boosts? What aspects of your personality would you are most valuable to you as a writer?

I get a lot of joy from learning what makes people tick, myself included. I’m by no means a psychologist or social anthropologist, but I often find myself observing strangers, wondering “why?” or “how?” they did or said the intriguing thing they just did or said. I’m usually compelled to ask, which occasionally proves risky (sometimes even regrettable), but most often fascinating. For myself, I’m inclined to turn inward and focus, sometimes with annoying, myopic persistence, on self-improvement. My marriage experienced some truly rocky road over the past few years and, now that we’ve survived the darkest times and moved on to a happier, more cohesive relationship, I can see how my personal relationship-building exercises have informed my writing. I think the romantic aspects of my storytelling used to focus quite a bit on “La-La” notions of romantic love. In truth, I was writing what I wanted more of in my real life! Now I feel my characters’ relationships progress in a more natural, believable way because I utilize some of the tools I learned via marriage counseling to inform my heroine’s and hero’s motivations and reactions. I’m a big fan of Deanna Raybourn, and one my favorite things about her Lady Julia Gray Series was the slow, steady, sometimes difficult evolution of the relationship between Nicholas and Lady Julia. All the romantic trappings I love were present – the intense attraction, the subtle flirting, the emotional support they provided to each other as friends and eventually as lovers – but what really captured me over the course of the series was how their relationship continued to grow and be challenged after their marriage. My GH manuscript is the first in a series, and I try to inject some of this…let’s call it “relationship realism” into my character arcs. In a fun way, of course. 🙂

That’s such a great point, about the real power of romance being about the complex push and pull between two complicated human beings, and not just “smooch smooch, I love you forever.”  I agree 100% about the wonderfulness of Deanna Raybourn on that score (and many other scores as well). Sherry Thomas is another who really stands out for me in terms of getting past the “La La” of romance to something more real. Same with Courtney Milan. Very inspiring for a writer to read. So what other kinds of books do you read?

It sounds trite, but I like a little of everything! One of my undergrad degrees is a BFA in Creative Writing, and I focused on poetry and short story throughout that program. These days I get my poetry fix from anthologies. My current poetry read, Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls, is from local author Karen Finneyfrock. I turn to magazines like The Sun for new, innovative short stories and memoirs. This year, one of my book clubs has focused on literary fiction by female writers, and I’ve discovered my newest favorite author, Tawni O’Dell. I try to read the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel in the fiction category each year, so right now I’m staying up late to devour The Goldfinch. For romance, I’ve encountered an interesting evolution in my decision-making as a result of the Golden Heart contest; I used to select romance authors based on recommendations, reviews, or whatever caught my fancy at the bookstore, but these days I’m surrounded by wonderful writers via my 2012 and 2014 Golden Heart classes! I get such a thrill reading their books and posting reviews (though I’m really behind with the second part. I need to step it up!). Generally, I bask in their talent and get sunshiny feelings from knowing that their publication dreams are churning in motion. A few members of our current GH class – the Dreamweavers – are releasing books this year, and I can’t wait to get those puppies on my Kindle!

Speaking of publication dreams, what are some of the most important things you’ve learned so far about the publishing industry and what writers need to do to get a foot in the door, and/or thrive? 

I’ve certainly learned more about the strength derived from perseverance. I’ve started to believe in my abilities, which frankly has been a life-long struggle. I now recognize the importance of writing from the heart, but with a keen eye on the market. These take-aways aren’t groundbreaking by any means, but what’s most important to me is how I choose to utilize these concepts. I feel fortunate to eek closer to publication at a time when so many paths to reach that goal are open to me. How we internalize abstract ideas such as perseverance, self-belief and writing our heart’s story makes all the difference in the amount of joy we get from this endeavor. I plan to write for the rest of my life, so I’m pretty damn focused on making it a sustainable production that does woo-woo things like feed my soul while it accomplishes practical things like augment my family’s income and allow me to model positive life skills for my kids. Not at all lofty goals, right? 😉

LOL—you’ll make it look easy, I’m sure. So now it’s time to move this conversation into more fully interactive mode. What question would you like to ask our readers to get the conversation going today?

 

Readers, I’d like to hear what real-life events most influence your writing, and in what ways? How does your life experiences inform your characters’ GMC?

 

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You can find Marni online at marnifolsom.com. She’s a self-described “unseasoned” user of social media, and invites you to help her out by linking up on Facebook (www.facebook.com/marni.folsom) and Twitter (@marnifolsom)…and then being very patient. J

67 responses to “Meet 2014 Golden Heart Finalist Marni Folsom!”

  1. Elisa Beatty says:

    Welcome, Marni! It’s great to have you with us!

    What a great question to ask. I’m not sure I have a coherent answer just at the moment, but what I can say is that if I have a “core theme” that comes out of my own experience it’s that my heroes and heroines seem to always have to work to learn to trust and open up and become vulnerable. That’s certainly been something I’ve had to work on in my own life…and I’m not sure why. Just a personality thing, I guess. But that’s a journey that feels palpable to me in fiction, book after book.

    Have fun today!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Thanks, Elisa, for hosting the Dreamweavers, and for your general fabulousness!

      I gravitate toward characters who need to learn how to trust and open up, too. I recently finished the third installment of Rebecca Donovan’s Breathing series, and poor Avery had to learn that lesson over and over and over…I could relate on that score. 😉 I also appreciate “unsinkable” heroines, which I know you write. That combo of vulnerability and can-do is pretty irresistible. I look very forward to reading your books, fellow Firebird!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Elisa, I forgot to say that I haven’t read Sherry Thomas yet, so I popped over to her site this morning and picked up Beguiling the Beauty. Thanks for the rekkie!

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  2. Gwyn says:

    Hey, Marni. Nice to see you here.

    Life experience is eclectic and diverse, but perhaps it’s being a Lone Ranger fan as a child that always has me seeking Truth, Justice, and the American Way!

    Kidding aside, I believe in true love and HEA, but I know from experience both take work. Looking back over my own marriage, I’ve seen and experienced the evolution of love from white hot and volitile to strong, comfortable, and secure. I’ve witnessed the weft and weave of two lives integrating to make a separate tapestry that has, in turn, produced scenes that have woven their way into the tapestries of my children’s lives. Rather amazing to think about. That’s the kind of thing that wends through my writing—along with truth, justice, and redemption. Needless to say, the writing has changed over the years.

    Great learning more about you, and as I have a love of Celtic myth and lore (an ancient prophesy has place in my finaling mss., too!), I look forward to seeing your book published.

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Ah, a kindred Celtic spirit. We must talk myth and lore, Gwyn! I’ve been in a quandary over the Pre-Celtic portions of my mss. True historians may take exception to the, erm, creative license I’ve taken. The best thing going for me is that any written history of the period contain a lot of supposition, any way.

      Thanks so much for your comments. I especially love: I’ve witnessed the weft and weave of two lives integrating to make a separate tapestry that has, in turn, produced scenes that have woven their way into the tapestries of my children’s lives.

      Beautiful…and telling. I can already tell I’ll enjoy reading your books!

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  3. Hi, Marni! Wow, your new-to-you home sounds idyllic. I’m so glad to hear your rocky road is much smoother now. I know too well how personal relationships can impact the rest of your life, especially when things aren’t going so well.

    Looking back on all my YA manuscripts, a recurring motif is “the absent parent,” and I bring to them my own experience as a child of divorce. Call me slow — it took me a while to see that motif in my own work, but I’m embracing it now.

    Love your synopsis and I can’t wait to read the whole book. See you in San Antonio, O Dreamweaver!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      It is a fine spot for sure, Vanessa…although this morning it’s rainy and cold enough to turn on the fireplace (in JUNE!) and that lovely deck is covered in droppings from our cedar trees. My idyllic writing spot won’t emerge until I break out the leaf blower so I have a place to plop my chair. 😉

      I so understand about taking a while to recognize a common thread in our work! Once I made that connection, I could also see how I also gravitate to those motifs in my favorite reads.

      Congrats again on your recent sale! Three woots for adding This is Your Afterlife (btw, is that the final title? I LOVE it.) to my TBR list!

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  4. Pintip says:

    Elisa and Marni, what a fabulous interview! Marni, I loved reading about your new home, how you inject romantic realism into your new stories, how you devour Firebird books, and how you’ve learned to “write from your heart with a keen eye to the market.”
    Most of my books end up having a dead parent, on account of the loss of my own mother, and there is also usually a strong, protective sibling relationship, as well.
    Best of luck on achieving your dreams, and congrats on this final!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Pintip, I think that’s the most powerful of all subject matters for YA books. Such a fragile time of life to carry the pang of parental (or friend, or sibling) loss. When I was 16 or so, I read a series of books called Ghostworld (I think! And I also think they were written by a husband & wife team, but don’t quote me on that.) The main characters were a living boy and the spirit of a girl who used to live in his house, and she helped him deal with a tragic loss in his own life. A lot of the settings were other-worldly, so the stories often straddled a fine line between romance, paranormal and sci-fi. Anyhoo, all these years later (many, many, I assure you!), I still remember my sympathy for these characters and their struggle to reclaim a life without the figure who was previously paramount in that life. Strong stuff for teen fiction!

      Thanks for stopping by. I’ll miss you in San Antonio, but I fully expect to see pictures of the new little one posted on the loop! ☺

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  5. June Love says:

    Hi, Marni! Welcome to the Ruby blog and congratulations on your GH final.

    Are there any houses close to you for sale? 🙂 Your real-life writing retreat sounds wonderful. What inspiration you have around you.

    I haven’t had my coffee yet, so I hope this makes sense. I believe it is a culmination of what has happened all through our lives that feed our creativity. My books generally have an expectations/acceptance theme laced with “life is too short” not to reach for that brass ring. Like I said…no coffee, yet. 🙂

    Loved your blurb and best of luck in San Antonio!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      June, I completely understand the no-coffee-yet feeling. For me, it’s often a must-have-that-fourth-shot feeling, but that’s mostly because the docs declined my request for an intravenous caffeine connection.

      I think you’re right that creativity is the grand combo of our life experience. All those onion layers make the stories possible and believable, huh? I see your stories have a Southern spin, which is a layer unto itself. 🙂 I’ll keep an eye out for your books! Thank you so much for stopping by.

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  6. Shelly Alexander says:

    Marni:

    I love the demigod spin! And I MUST visit you in Seattle. I’ve never been there and always wanted to go. You make is sound like Heaven on Earth!

    Great interview!

    Shelly Alexander

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Yes, you should definitely come to Seattle. I should warn you, though: Many friends and family members who’ve come to visit have eventually moved here. Just sayin’. 😉

      Thanks for reading and giving me a shout, Shelly!

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  7. Abbie Roads says:

    Marni!

    You house location sounds spectacular! Nature is always such an inspiration to me.

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Yep, it’s pretty incredible…but I need a sunlamp today!

      Thanks for stopping by, Abbie.

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  8. Hi Marni!!

    My husband travels to Seattle quite a bit and he says it’s really beautiful. I keep planning to go out with him sometime, but with the kids…. 🙂

    Your story sounds so cool! I love anything with a paranormal twist. Can’t wait to read it! And can’t wait to meet a fellow Marn in San Antonio! 😉

    Marnee

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Marnee, I’m thinking we need to create a special Marnilicious drink and toast each other with a tall glass of it in San Antonio. What do you say? A fizzy-daiquiry whammy, a frosty concoction with essences of vanilla and Irish cream, or…?

      Your hubby’s right, it’s a lovely city. But I know about traveling with kids! If I think of a way to bring the Seattle to you, I’ll do it. 🙂

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  9. Hi Marni. That was a really great post. I loved hearing about your writing environment, but I really appreciated your honesty about your life and struggles. I bet the relationship development in your books is fantastic. I like books where it’s slower-developing as well. Besides writing about the TV news business because of my background, I tend to write about girls who have trust issues and fight being in love until they just can’t fight anymore because that was my own life experience. Thankfully someone was even more stubborn than me, dug his heels in and outlasted all my resistance, or I would never have found my HEA. Looking forward to meeting you in person soon! 🙂

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Aw, thanks so much, Amy. I’ve never been one for ignoring the elephant in the room…especially when it has such far-reaching impact.

      I love that your guy dug his heels in! I want to hear a little more about your true life HEA. Maybe that story will help me relax before I practice my pitches with you. 🙂 Look forward to seeing you in…ooh! Just a little over a month!

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  10. Marni,
    Just the description of your writing retreat made me feel all fuzzy and zen-like:)

    I’m not sure what theme runs through my books. Maybe learning to trust? Does this mean I have trust issues? Do I need to talk to a professional? lol.

    Seriously though, your book sounds amazing! And, I can’t wait to meet you in San Antonio.

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      LOL, Laura. You never know, those trust issues are sneaky little buggers. 😉

      See you soon in San Antonio!

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  11. McCall Hoyle says:

    Love the post! Would love to be invited to a write-in at your house! I find my stories always circle back to teenage girls learning that they have to like themselves before the rest of the world will. When they learn some variation of this lesson, they usually find a HEA. I’m sure this is a result of being a teenage girl and working with teenage girls every day…

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      That’s right, McCall, you have an inside track on the paramount struggles for that age group! I’m the youngest of 4 girls, so you hit the nail on the head of a challenge our household was forever dealing with. I can’t wait to read your books and see your unique twist on the theme. And a side note since I’m feeling all girly this morning: I completely *love* your haircut! 🙂

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  12. Hi Marni,

    My writing inspiration is the outdoors, too, on 120 acres of country on the west coast of Florida! It’s a different atmosphere than Washington state, but beautiful in its own way.

    I love the blurb for your book and can’t wait to read it.

    See you in San Antonio.

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Holy lawnmower, Connie! 120 acres?? That’s quite the space! I hope you have a special spot for writing. The kids are a constant reminder to me that I need to be outside as much as possible. We have our wet months, of course, but when it’s sunny here, everything glows — especially everyone’s mood!

      Thanks for stopping by, and happy Golden Heart to you, too. 🙂

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  13. Marni,

    Welcome and congtrats! Excellent question.

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  14. Tamara Hogan says:

    Congrats on your GH final, Marni! Your blurb sounds fantastic.

    Concerning real-life events and themes in our work – what an astute question, and I know it’s true in my case in a number of ways. I’ve lived with chronic health problems since I was a teenager, so in an epic case of “write what you know”, themes of illness and health abound in my work. In addition, as a technology worker and an introvert, the boundary between public and private is embedded in my series’ very world. The characters in my Underbelly Chronicles series have secretly shared Earth with humanity for millennia, but given the uptick in technology and surveillance, the risk of exposure grows greater with every book. Needless to say, humanity’s not AT ALL ready for the news.

    See you in San Antonio!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Ooooh, Tamara, I love the description of your Underbelly Chronicles. I will definitely check them out. Thanks so much for stopping by!

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  15. Nan Dixon says:

    Hey Marni —
    Congratulations on this year’s final! Your premise sounds fantastic. Can’t wait to read it!
    I think my writing is most influenced by family, both my siblings and my own children.
    I’ve been trying to toy with my own brand — and I now believe, even if I’m not writing about siblings in a family, I’m creating new families for my characters.

    This is probably because my three sisters and I are so close. We’ve survived tragedies and triumphs and still find time to laugh. I just hope I’ve passed this closeness on to my children. Because — in the end family gets you through the bad times.

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      HI, Nan! I agree, family does see you through. Characters forming new families…that’s one of my common motifs, too. Ohm I am chomping at the bit to read your book!

      And can we talk about this “branding” exercise a bit? I always feel like it should be simple, but I’m completely confounded. And annoyed, mostly with myself and my inability to pull just one catchy, descriptive, meaningful phrase together. Aaagh!

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  16. Julie Mulhern says:

    Great post Marni –

    I love reading about where people write!

    A few years ago, we took the kids to NOLA. While there, we visited Marie LeVeau’s grave and I wondered about the Section 8 next to the cemetery. The buildings looked very new for such and old city. I did a little research, discovered Storyville and A Haunting Desire began.

    A long way of saying an interest in history influences my writing.

    Congratulations!!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Julie, you already know of my love for A Haunting Desire, but this little factoid about the kernel of the story coming from a visit to Marie LaVeau’s grave makes me love it even more.

      And you never have to apologize to wordy-wordy me about a long way of anything…. 😉

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  17. First, I love paranormal romances, and BEYOND THE FIRE sounds fantastic. Can’t wait to read it! And your house also sounds gorgeous. What a lovely place to write.

    I recently moved away from the city myself, and am now living on a lake in a suburb of DC – I like to call it Denny’s Lake House:)…

    I can look up from my computer and see geese, trees, water and a calmness I really enjoy.

    Looking forward to meeting you next month!

    Great post!

    Denny

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Denny’s Lake House sounds wonderful. Our setting is certainly fantastic, but I’ll let you in on a little secret: The house itself needs a LOT of work. I’m often elbow deep in DIY, so there’s a teensy bit of avoidance involved in my writing sojourns on the deck. 😉

      I look really forward to meeting you in person soon, Denny!

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  18. Marni,
    For me, becoming a mother significantly influenced my writing (and not just by reducing the time and increasing the drive I needed to keep writing). While I haven’t written many books yet with children in them, that connection definitely influences me.

    I also really love the idea that HEA is about more than just “I love you, now everything gets to be perfect.” I like the depth of real love, which can get messy, can hurt, but it can also be the source of immense strength, as I’ve found in my own relationships, especially with my husband. I hope I can convey some of that in my writing. 🙂

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Shelly, your comment about motherhood “reducing the time and increasing the drive” is true for me, too. I had several half-written manuscripts before the kids came along. Now I’ve finished 4 of them (though they still need much work!) and written 2 more. Nothing like a deadline — even a self-imposed one — to light a fire under me!

      I’m finding the depth of real love to be a lot more fun to write that I anticipated. That is for the paranormal series. Lots of built-in conflict for those characters to muck through on their road to accepting each other as life-long mates. But I’m struggling a bit with the love story of my WIP, which is New adult. I think I need to just get myself out of the way. I keep getting hung up on my own feelings toward love when I was that age, which were along the lines of, “I have all the time in the world”, which isn’t really conducive to my story’s HEA! A little easier said than done, but I’m working on it.

      Hope your writing is going well this week!

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  19. Carrie Padgett says:

    Hi Marni! Great post!
    I grew up as the “good girl,” the one who didn’t act up and always tried to keep the peace at home. I’ve noticed that many of my stories have a theme of reconciliation. Guess I can’t leave my peacekeeping days behind…

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Carrie, from what I’ve learned so far, I can see you as a wonderful peace keeper! That’s a most valuable role in my family. 😉 Thank you for stopping by!

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  20. Congrats on the final! As for real life influence, my first real job out of college was with a foster care and adoption agency. I saw some pretty incredible things–tragic, confusing, and sometimes darkly funny. I’m working on an idea where the backstory involves an unusual family situation where the court has been involved. A few cases in particular I wondered what happened to get the people to the point they were.

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Stephanie, those “I wonder” questions lead to great books! The court involvement sounds intriguing. I often shy away from those technical research situations in my stories, but I love to read them in others’ work. Thank you for stopping by and commenting!

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  21. Terri Osburn says:

    This is an AMAZING blurb. I want to read this. Right now. Seriously. The way you describe your real life surroundings is better than most anything I write. LOL! It’s no wonder you’re a (two-time) finalist!

    As to your question, I still write how I wish life and love could be. As a jaded divorcee, I don’t have a real life HEA to draw from. But I still believe in love and the strength it takes to find and keep it.

    Congrats again, Marni. Looking forward to seeing you in San Antonio!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Terri, LOL. I’m amazed anything I write makes sense these days! I think that description you like was interrupted by about a gazillion comments in the vein of “Please don’t jump on the sofa” or “Your brother’s asking for a turn with that toy” or “Mama needs to go potty all by herself this time”. 🙂

      You know 3 of those GH sisters’ books I mentioned were yours, right? I still need to post a review for Home to Stay (sorry!), but can I just tell you how much I loved Randy? *swoon* Such a great hero for her.

      Thanks for saying hello, and I hope to see you & many more Firebirds in San Antonio!

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  22. Sharon Wray says:

    What a lovely interview Marni and Elise. I just loved the blurb and can’t wait to read this book one day.

    As for you question, I write about people who have no power (it was stripped or taken from them) and have to fight to get people to believe them because they are the only ones who see the truth. And I can honestly say this comes from a growing up as a child of an alcoholic. But while I write intense suspense stories, there’s always an ending filled with redemption, forgiveness and love.
    Can’t wait for San Antonio!

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Oh, Sharon, you know I love redemption stories, right? How wonderful that you can channel your childhood experiences into writing accomplishments. That’s the way, my friend. 🙂 I can’t wait for Nationals, either!

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  23. Hi, Marni! SOOO excited for you being a Golden Heart Finalist!!! I will be in San Antonio, cheering you on. I love how you’ve injected “reality” into your stories, from the life lessons you’ve learned. You GO, GIRL! I can’t wait to read your books – I loved reading this blog post!!! You DO have a way with words and your story looks awesome. What do I write about from life? Ha! I think you know it has to do with anchors and big gray things that sail on the high seas. But beyond setting, I love working in the pearls of wisdom I’ve learned thus far in this journey called life. See you in SAN ANTONIO!!! Hee-HAW!!! Hugs, Heather

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Heather, your enthusiasm is so contagious. I really love those anchors and big gray things you write about…the heroes aren’t so bad either! Thank you, as always, for your support and encouragement. I smile every single time I see your name in my inbox. 🙂 Looking forward to delivering some hugs in person in just a few weeks!

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  24. Jillian Lark says:

    Marni,
    Congratulations on the GH final! You had me at scones and Seattle area. Love both. I don’t eat scones that often, but I visit the Pacific Northwest once a year. At least I write about scones in my stories, which are set in 19th century England.

    I can’t wait to read your books and meet you and our Dreamweaver sisters in July. BTW I’ll be in the Seattle area this fall, too.~Jillian

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    • Marni Folsom says:

      Jillian, I had no idea you came this way once a year. Autumn is such a good time, too. Please do call me if you find time in your itinerary for a Dreamweaver visit. I’d love to see you! We have a couple of “hidden” tea shops in Seattle. To-die-for everything (including the scones & clotted cream!), but off the beaten path enough to stay clear of touristy crowds. My treat. 🙂

      I’m excited to see you in July, too. Thanks for stopping by to comment!

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  25. Hey Marni!

    So much fun to read about my fellow Washingtonian GH2014 finalist. I’m arriving late to the party because I was in the other WA, the DC one, over the weekend.

    Can’t wait to meet you in San Antonio!

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  26. Elisa Beatty says:

    Thanks so much for spending the day with us, Marni!

    Good luck in San Antonio, and on getting that book in our hands PRONTISSIMO!!

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