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Behold My P-ness! Writers, Myers-Briggs, and an Introvert’s Guide to RWA National

The Rubies had a fascinating discussion recently about personality traits,  and how those personality traits impact our behavior at large events such as the RWA National Conference, which is NEXT WEEK already!! This discussion very quickly turned to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (R).

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a personality typing exercise based upon the work of psychologist Carl Jung, and it helps people assess their preferences for:

  • focusing their attention or getting their energy (Extraversion or Introversion)
  • taking in information (Sensing or iNtuition)
  • making decisions (Thinking or Feeling)
  • orienting themselves to the external world (Judging or Perceiving)

We can’t go into all the nitty-gritty details about Myers-Briggs here; if you’d like more information about MBTI concepts, go to “MBTI Basics” at The Myers-Briggs Foundation, Wikipedia, and the Cognitive Style Inventory at Personality Pathways.

After answering the MBTI’s questions, you receive a designation for each category which reflects your preferences. These designations combine to make 16 possible MBTI ‘types’.

I was exposed to Myers-Briggs as a team-building exercise at my day job, and going through this activity helped our work team understand and value each others’ task preferences and communication styles. For example, Jon (ESTJ) loves presenting, gains energy from crowds, is very verbal at meetings, and prefers phone contact. I (INFP) prefer to fly under the radar and work independently, find phone calls and instant messages distracting (email, please!), and though I’m quiet at meetings unless I have something specific to say, I’m the first to notice body language and emotional subtext.

This team building exercise also led to a plethora of completely politically incorrect “P-ness” jokes, but that’s neither here nor there.  😉

Some people report their MBTI designation shifting over time. While remaining an INFP, if anything my introverted tendencies have shifted to the more extreme end of the curve over the last decade or so.  I recently scored a flat zero on the free IPIP-NEO short form’s overarching Extraversion Domain – that’s zero on a scale from zero to 100 – so when I say I’m a massive introvert, I have data to back that up.

To quote from that instrument:

Introverts lack the exuberance, energy, and activity levels of extraverts. They tend to be quiet, low-key, deliberate, and disengaged from the social world. Their lack of social involvement should not be interpreted as shyness or depression; the introvert simply needs less stimulation than an extravert and prefers to be alone. The independence and reserve of the introvert is sometimes mistaken as unfriendliness or arrogance. In reality, an introvert who scores high on the agreeableness dimension will not seek others out but will be quite pleasant when approached.

Ding-ding-ding-ding-ding!

Looking at this through the lens of the RWA National conference… at times, I find the exuberance, noise and activity level of the conference to be very draining. Over the week I’m in NYC, I’ll recharge my batteries by occasionally slipping up to my room for an hour of silence and decompression time, or sitting in a quiet alcove with my headset on, blocking out the world for a couple of essential minutes.

Don’t get me wrong – like many introverts, I’m not shy.  I’m part of the “Road to Novel Completion: Potholes, Pit-Stops and Poppy Fields, Oh My!” panel the Rubies are presenting on Thursday morning at 8:30 a.m., and hope to see everybody there!  But you definitely won’t find me closing down the bar.  And while it might take conscious effort for me to initiate conversations in a cocktail party situation – exhausting! – one thing that’s completely manageable for me to do is to sit down and share lunch with strangers who like to read or write romance!  “Where are you from?” “What do you like to write/read?”  Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

I AM quite pleasant when approached! So whether it’s after the Ruby panel, at the “Readers for Life” Literacy Signing, the Sourcebooks author signing, or just milling about, flag me down! I’d love to talk about reading, writing, and of course, OUR VERY FIERCE SHOES.

How about you? At RWA National, will we see you dancing on the tables, or observing the debauchery from the sidelines? Feel free to share your favorite large-event coping mechanisms, and your Myers-Briggs type if you know it.

Tamara Hogan’s debut urban fantasy romance, TASTE ME, was released earlier this year by Sourcebooks. Underbelly Chronicles Book Two, CHASE ME, will be published in Spring 2012.

78 responses to “Behold My P-ness! Writers, Myers-Briggs, and an Introvert’s Guide to RWA National”

  1. Gwynlyn MacKenzie says:

    It’s easy to get overwhelmed at conference, and I, too, need quiet time. A little conversation with a friend or two is always a welcome break from the mob. I much prefer smaller groups where people can actually converse.

    As for my Myers-Briggs type, I took the test once, and I think it came out ESFJ, but I’m not sure. Yes, a few drinks (and sometimes even without them) and I’ll be singing with whomever wants to sing (just because I love to sing), but no tabletop dances. I do, however, like to be in control, and conference can feel chaotic—even organized chaos is stressful. But it’s all worth it.

    Love the boot! *G*

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Gwynlyn, I’d definitely be there singing at your side! I love to sing. When I sing karaoke, I typically look for songs with a male lead vocal so the range is in the ballpark. 😉

      And I’m actually very bummed about the red boots! I ordered a pair, thinking I’d be wearing them at National next week. But they just didn’t fit well enough and I had to return them.

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      • Gwynlyn MacKenzie says:

        ACK! No red boots? I had a pair, but I gave them to Goodwill. They fit, but could only wear them for a short time. I’ll be tottering around the house in heels for the next few days just to awaken my lazy ankles. I haven’t worn a real heal since DC. (A sad testament, but true.)

        P.S. I’ve never done karaoke, but I’ve been singing duets and harmony since birth (okay, maybe a slight exaggeration, but not much!) Do you know Margaritaville? *G*

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        • Tamara Hogan says:

          Never fear, I DO have red boots! Just not the ones I thought I’d have. 😉

          I love singing high harmony. I know OF “Margaritaville” but I have to admit that it’s a little twangy for my personal taste!

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  2. Diana Layne says:

    I find conferences quite draining too, and escape to my room often, but then again, what a not-to-be-missed kind of experience! Great article, thanks for sharing your knowledge!

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    • Diana Layne says:

      Oh, I’m an INFJ

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      hi Diana! One of the things I’ve learned the hard way over the years is that it’s SO worth it for me to have my own room when I’m at these events. I consider it a productivity investment.

      For me, I think a lot of the energy drain being in large cowds has to do with the noise level. I hear so many competing sounds and conversations that I find it difficult to stay focused on the one I’m trying to have, if that makes sense. I have a hard time filtering out what other people might consider background noise. For me, it’s all foreground, which is why I find the bar rather excruciating. I can’t hear a damn thing. This phenomenon has become a bigger challenge for me over the last decade or so with all the cell phones out and about in the public sphere. It’s harder to find a cone of silence.

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  3. Beth Caudill says:

    My husband and I were required to take the test as part of our marriage counseling. I am an INTJ.

    And I find an hour break from the chaos a must have. Usually on the third day. It’s nice to be around people who aren’t little kids or imaginary at the beginning but by the end I’m really tired of having everyone around me. I have problem focusing.

    A lot of times my extrovert friends don’t understand how being in a crowd of people is draining. Even if you don’t talk to anyone. There’s just too much energy all around.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Beth, I know just what you mean when you say you’re tired of havinge everyone around you. In my family, we have a saying – “Too many hips in the kitchen” – used when we’re preparing, say, Thanksgiving dinner together and we’re all bumping into each other. I hit “too many hips” DEFCON Level 1 very quickly at RWA National.

      The Rubies are used to me joking that, emotionally speaking, I’m probably a gay man living in a woman’s body. So here’s where I admit that I occasionally seek out casual conversations with male attendees, just for an estrogen break. But their shoes aren’t nearly as interesting as ours are!

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  4. INTJ here, or so I think. I’m sure that will surprise some people, and would certainly shock people who knew me in high school and college. But like you, Tammy, I’ve grown more introverted in the last decade, and I’m happier this way.

    My mother is extremely outgoing and I feel like I know how to mimic her, but I’m never happy after spending a few hours in a crowd. I can do it, and I may feel like I enjoy it at the time, but I’m always exhausted afterward. Likewise, I also can’t spend a whole day with another person without a break (unless it’s my husband; he’s an exception, blessedly).

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      –> I’m never happy after spending a few hours in a crowd. I can do it, and I may feel like I enjoy it at the time, but I’m always exhausted afterward.

      Me too! Being a rather organized sort, I have an Outlook calendar I’ve prepared for the week of Nationals, reflecting all of my chapter events, signings, social commitments, etc – and I’ve already blocked out my windows of decompression time!

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      • Ah, I should be doing that, too!

        I bailed on a lunch at RWA last year because I just needed some alone time, free lunch be damned. I wandered up to the zoo and chilled for a while. Best decision ever.

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  5. Jody Vitek says:

    Great post, Tammy. I took the test years ago and I fell into the ESFJ category. Don’t know as if it fits me all that well because I am an introvert when it comes to a group of people. I am not an extrovert unless I know you. When in a large group setting such as nationals, I will not approach you and start up a conversation unless you start one. Then, I will become the extrovert the test says I am. My one time experience at national was fantastic and I would do it all again! Probably because I make lists and plan things out in advance. Have a great time in NYC!

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Thanks, Jody! I’m much the same as far as initiating and approaching. Why do so when you’re perfectly happy with your own company? 😉 This takes effort for me, which is something I’m working on.

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  6. Great blog. And you really are perfectly delightful one on one. I should take the test. I’m fine in people crowds but in places like Vegas where the machines rule, I go nuts. But I’m pretty bad at small talk so starting a conversation is a chore. I think having your own room at a conference is definitely a good way to go. Even though I like crowds, that breather in your own space can revitalize. Have fun at Nationals, Tammy!

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      –> And you really are perfectly delightful one on one.

      Good to know! As my critique parter, we DO spend a fair amount of time together. 😉

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  7. liz talley says:

    I find this fascintating and I’m certain I’ve never done this test. I’d love to know what I am. Maybe someday…

    I feel I’d test as an extrovert. I feed on the enthusiasm of others and get a “high” from conference. I want to see everything, do everything, but usually on the last day it catches up with me and I crash – becoming grumpy and more withdrawn.

    My husband is definately an introvert who has to play at being extroverted all day long. So when he arrives home, he often eats and then heads to his man cave where he plays guitar all night long. Sometimes it bugs me because I want him in the living room with me and the kiddos, but I’ve come to understand that we have better quality time with him, if he can decompress and be alone for a while. So this makes sense to me. BTW, he has to hide when my family of extra-extroverts come over. LOL.

    Fun topic for today!

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Good for you for recognizing that hubs needs some decompression time after work. Yes, I think you’d probably test out as an extrovert, too. 😉

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  8. Vivi Andrews says:

    I love Myers Briggs! I’m an INTJ. (The “mastermind” which always makes me feel like a supervillain. 😉 )

    At conferences, I tend to prefer sitting and observing in group situations – not that I don’t have opinions, but in a group larger than 4 people you aren’t likely to hear them. I would have avoided giving a GH speech if I could (just like I dodged the Valedictorian speech in high school) but it’s not about stage fright – it’s more a conviction that I would just be boring everyone to tears. I’m really looking forward to a conference where I can enjoy it on my own terms – flying under the radar sounds pretty good to me.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      I also prefer sitting and observing, but when I decide to talk, people tend to listen, if that makes any sense. But one thing I’ve discovered about my communication habits is that what’s perceived as positive and productive in my workplace (succinctness) can be perceived negatively by, say, my family. One of my sisters once told me that sometimes when I finally decide to weigh in on something, my opinion cracks like a whip. I’m working on that.

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  9. I love that you say you’re an introvert, but you’re not shy. I’d never heard that distinction before, but I think it fits for me, too. It’s been years since I took the test, but I remember being an IN…something something. 🙂 I love being home, alone, in the quiet (not that that happens often with three kids and a hubby who works from home). But like you, I can mingle and make friends and adapt to the situation. And all these years I thought I was shy. 😉

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      I’ve recently come to realize just how many aspects of my life have been crafted, whether consciously or through sheer dumb luck, to accommodate my need for solitude and silence. I was married to (and am divorced from) an extrovert, and am now in a long-term relationship with a fellow introvert who I’m so much more compatible with. I don’t have children by choice. I live in a rural area with plenty of elbow room, though I’m within an easy drive to any urban activity you’d care to name. But partaking in those activities is on my terms. 😉

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  10. Hope Ramsay says:

    I have never taken the test, so I don’t know what I am. This sort of reminds me of the “are you a right brained or left brained person,” question. I have taken those tests and I turn out to be one of those wacky mid-brained people.

    And I’m kind of like that when it comes to introversion/extroversion. I like being with people and I feed off that energy, but I still get overwhelmed and need some alone time. I’ve never been bored with my own company, but I really like to hang at the bar and talk to people.

    RWA exhausts me, but I’m not sure it’s the crowd so much as it’s the running from one thing to the next. So you won’t be seeing me in any high-heeled ruby shoes (or boots), that’s for sure. I plan to bring my sneakers.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Hi Hope – it sounds to me like you’re a well-balanced individual! A number of people who take Myers-Briggs find themselves right on the line on one or more of the domains – and keep in mind that the instrument assesses for PREFERENCES, not for ABILITIES. Even a massive introvert like me enjoys being around her friends, or can present a workshop to hundreds of people. I just need to recover afterward. 😉

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    • Gwynlyn MacKenzie says:

      I and my son are both equally right and left-brained, Hope. Sometimes it feels as if I’m at war with myself, and it can make taking decisive action difficult. I’ve always enjoyed performing, but when I was done, I wanted everyone to go away and leave me alone—which, apparently, isn’t an option.

      Niches are such narrow things. Does anyone ever really fit in one?

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  11. Sara Ramsey says:

    Great post, Tammy! I love that this discussion came up – personality types are so interesting to me, and I try to figure some of this out for my main characters when I’m writing a story since it helps to determine how they might react to something.

    I’ve taken the Myers-Briggs three times. At 16 I was an ENTP; sometime shortly after college I was an ENTJ; and last year I flipped back to ENTP. However, the gap between my E and I scores is narrowing, and only three points separate me from being an I. I have a feeling that as I get older, my introversion will increase. I don’t really feel comfortable in large groups, but if I know everyone in the group, people would think that I’m a total E by the way I act. Or maybe that’s the alcohol talking 😉

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Another well-balanced individual!

      About introversion tendencies increasing with age…for me there’s definitely something to that. I think as I get older, I see less and less reason to fight my natural preferences. Frankly as time goes on, I care less about what others think of me. The silver lining of aging!

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  12. Liz Selvig says:

    Hi Tammy,
    What a great post. I love learning about other peoples’ personality types, and I’m learning more and more to seek the “expertise” of people who have different strengths than I do. I’ve never taken the Myers-Briggs but strictly on the surface I feel like I’d be an INFP — I’m definitely an extrovert with not a lot of inherent logic to shore me up!

    As for nationals, if I didn’t know it would completely shatter any future reputation, I’d be the one dancing on the tables. I am completely jazzed by meeting new people and learning as much as I can about them, talking, flitting from conversation to conversation and taking in as much atmosphere as possible. The louder the laughter, the happier I am and the more I enjoy whatever quiet time I do take. I love to stay up late anyway so I’m thrilled to find friends who’ll stay late at the bar talking and afterward I’m happy to chatter away with my roommates like teenagers at a slumber party. This, of course, surprises no-one who knows me and can be a highly annoying trait to most people 😀

    So, Nationals is a huge adrenaline rush for me; I don’t get tired and I don’t crash until I get home. And then the crash is just to recharge so I can start all over again. I just figure that even in the olden days the people needed court jesters.

    Can’t wait to annoy, er, see you in New York! I can attest to the fact that you are definitely a joy in person!

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  13. I’m so right on the fence with these things. While I’m fairly social, I don’t tend to just thrust myself out there. No dancing on the tables for me.

    I need to take the MB again. I took it years ago and have changed since then, I’m sure. It’s so interesting though. I love the insights it offers.

    Great post, Ruby Sis!!!
    Can’t wait to hang with you!
    ~D~

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Poor Darynda has seen me in prime cocktail party form, scowling in ferocious concentration as I struggle to try to hear what someone two feet away is saying… If I scowl at anyone, that’s what’s going on!

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  14. Anne Barton says:

    This was SO interesting, Tammy! I was a psych minor and find these tests fascinating. I’ve loved reading all the comments and hearing the different MB types too.

    It took me a while to find careers that I love (writing and teaching) but it’s interesting that they line up perfectly with my MB type (INFJ).

    Thanks for the great info, and I can’t wait to see you next week!

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Anne, I was a psych minor as well, though my studies gravitated more to what was called Abnormal Psych back in the day. I have friends to tell me that if the technology and writing gigs dry up, I should train to be a profiler.

      I’m a telecommuting technologist – introvert HEAVEN! – and find it useful to be just barely over on the Perceiving side of Judging/Perceiving. I use hard data regularly in my job, but I supplement that information by reading body language and having a working knowledge of emotional intelligence. I use and trust both types of data.

      See you next week!

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    • Elisa Beatty says:

      That’s right…INFJ is “The Teacher.” I got that once. Last time I took it, I’d moved to INFP, which apparently moved me over to “The Healer.”

      I’m very, very solidly an N and F, but I flip-flop on the E/I and J/P scales, depending on what mood I’m in when I take the test, or the exact wording of the questions. (Honestly, for so many of the questions I’m internally wailing, “It DEPENNNNDS!”).

      I wonder what ENFJ and ENFP are….

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      • Elisa Beatty says:

        I tried googling to find out, and accidentally typed in ENJP, which came back as “Evil Nazi Jetpack Penguins.” Wonder what Jung would make of that?

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      • Elise Hayes says:

        Ditto, Elisa. I’m firmly an N and T, but the E/I and J/P change for me depending on my mood and what’s happening in my life at that time.

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  15. Shoshana Brown says:

    I don’t know my Myers-Briggs type, but I can tell you without taking any tests that I’m an introvert. As for conference scheduling, I’ve tried to keep dinners and other events that aren’t with really good friends I’m totally comfortable with to a minimum. They always seem like a great idea from the comfort of home, but I know that once I get to conference I’m going to need some down time.

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  16. Julie Brannagh says:

    I’m an INFJ. Hear me roar. 😉 The best thing that happened to me was realizing it wasn’t necessarily a bad thing to need to recharge my batteries by spending time alone.

    I wonder what percentage of RWA members are introverts.

    I’m also wondering how many here need several days post-conference to decompress.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      I remember feeling a huge sense of validation when I looked at my Myers-Briggs results. The trained test administrator did a great job of explaining common misperceptions people had of both introverts and extraverts. The following article explains it better than I ever could: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2003/03/caring-for-your-introvert/2696/

      Though extraverts dominate in the general population (I’ve read anywhere from 60-75%), I’d bet money that RWA’s membership skews Introverted.

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      • Elisa Beatty says:

        Oh…fantastic article!!

        The opening lines: “Do you know someone who needs hours alone every day? Who loves quiet conversations about feelings or ideas, and can give a dynamite presentation to a big audience, but seems awkward in groups and maladroit at small talk?” That’s me all over. (I also loved the line about introverts being the minority in the general population, but the majority among the gifted. LOL!!)

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  17. Laurie Kellogg says:

    This is interesting, Tammy. I think I’m an ESTJ, but now that I know this, I’m a little unclear as to how I can use this information.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Laurie, I think that’s one of the reasons why the Myers-Briggs Foundation recommends that people take the test with the assistance of a trained administrator. The administrator can provide expert interpretation, context, and target the findings to real-world situations.

      Having had that experience through my workplace, I’ve found Myers-Briggs to be an amazing resource – particularly for self-knowledge.

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  18. Amanda Brice says:

    Great post, Tammy. I don’t think I’ve ever taken a Myers-Briggs, but like Liz, I’m fairly sure I’d test as a classic extrovert.

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    • Amanda Brice says:

      Oh, and I’ll leave the table dancing to the non-pregnant amongst us, but otherwise I’ve been known to get down. The DJ pulled me onto the stage at the Harlequin party a couple of years ago during the Grease Mega-mix. And yup…I totally hammed it up. I make an excellent Sandy, if I do say do myself.

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  19. Elisa Beatty says:

    Great post, Tammy!!

    This is such fascinating stuff. When we were talking about Meyers-Brigg it on the Ruby yahoo loop, I was struck by how many of us were “INF.” J or P seemed to be the biggest variable.

    Introversion makes perfect sense for writers, and F for romance writers.
    Though many other combinations apparently work as well. It sort of sounds like the F/T split may go with the pantser/plotter divide.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      I’ve never thought to apply Myers-Briggs to writing process. Interesting!

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    • Elise Hayes says:

      Funny that you’d say that, Elisa…I was thinking the exact same thing.

      I was tested years ago and came out between an INTJ and an INTP. There’s no question that I’m a “T” (thinking) rather than an “F” (feeling), thought. And I’m definitely a plotter. Getting into my characters and their feelings is always my greatest challenge.

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  20. Nan Dixon says:

    Oh Tamara – you’re bringing back my corporate days. I am an ENTJ. Give me chaos and my energy goes sky high. Maybe that’s why leaving the conference is always such a downer for me. I will however try and not dance on the tables. (Please stop me if you witness this behavior!)

    Great post.

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  21. Kate Parker says:

    I’m an INTJ who was once pegged very appropriately by a coworker who said, “I used to think you were stuck up but now I know you’re just shy.”

    I’m completely introverted and can’t stand large noisy crowds and can’t figure out how to talk to strangers. You can see the hamsters in my mind running around their wheels until they get traction and then I can figure out how to say hello. Workshops at National, even though they’re huge and cramped, are easy for me, because I don’t have to say anything, and there is so much to learn.

    At home, if I don’t get my hours at the computer writing, I feel like the day is out of balance. I need that creating time. At National conference, I think the workshops must fill that need for me.

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    • Tina Joyce says:

      Kate, I’m an INFJ…but yep, I can relate to everything you said. Although, I can talk to strangers one on one, if you put me in a large noisy crowd, I immediately start thinking of ways to escape.

      Nationals can be stressful, but I do enjoy being around other writers. I just have to be able to retreat to my room periodically so I can regroup and prepare for the next event.

      So sorry I’m missing all the fun this year!

      I’m really going to miss going this year.

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    • Kim Law says:

      Been told many times (after people got to know me) they’d thought I was either arrogant, stuck up, or intimidating. Rarely are those intentional 😉

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  22. Tamara Hogan says:

    I love taking classes – as long as I can participate on my own terms. That’s one of the things I love about workshops ar National. There’s just so much knowledge floating around, all of it prefaced with some variation of, “Use what works, and ignore what doesn’t” which strikes me as so utterly practical.

    One of the few things I like about large events is how easy it is to just set off on your own, walk around by yourself, do your own thing. You can meet up with friends occasionally, but there’s plenty to do solo.

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  23. Kim Law says:

    Ok…INTJ here. 100% I, 0% E. Though looking forward to seeing NYC, I’m already dreading all those people and the noise. I’m also strongly T. I’m a plotter, yet very character driven, but I just need it all figured out and structured or I can’t write. I’ve flip flopped N and S before, but started as N. And am pretty heavily J.

    And I LOVE being in the minority! 😉

    Here’s what gets me. I will sit in a crowd and watch. I’m uncomfortable starting or reacting to conversations with strangers. And I’d so rather stay home and hide. But I’ve shocked many people before when they learn this about me. I can apparently fake it well at times. And at work…I’m often hard to shut up in meetings.

    But man…I couldn’t survive without down time. Thank goodness the husband suffers from the same thing. We’re often as far apart in the house as we can get 🙂

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      –> We’re often as far apart in the house as we can get

      This sounds very familiar. 😉 Weekends at our house involve me pretty much holding down the fort in the house, and Mark being outside on the acreage doing…something, or puttering in one of the outbuildings or in his workshop. I might bring him some water while he’s out on the tractor, or nag him about sunscreen. He might come in and ask me for a design consult on some shelving he’s decided he needs. We each have our own offices (w/no kids, bedrooms can be repurposed!) and some days when we both work from home, we email each other from behind closed doors rather than walk the 20 feet separating us.

      Mark’s kind of a hero amongst his friends because I never care if he decides to have a beer or two with friends on short notice. He’ll call, let me know he’ll be late, but I’m all (shrug) “Have fun, honey.” I’m pretty much the lowest maintenance partner evah.

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      • Kim Law says:

        So sorry I didn’t get to chat on here yesterday while everyone else was. I’d been looking forward to this disucssion, but with pretty much day-long meetings on Thursdays, I didn’t even get to see what today’s blog was until I got home!

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    • Tina Joyce says:

      Kim, my N and S have switched before–I’m really borderline in that area (so I claim both, depending on my mood). But my I and J are really, really set (extreme farthest range).

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  24. I’ve never done the official test, but I’d guess I’m an INTJ. [Pause while everyone who knows me goes “Duh!”] I don’t mind the noise at Nationals, or public speaking, but actually interacting with people one-on-one exhausts me. I’m another one who has to have a room to herself. Great post. Hope everyone has a wonderful time in NYC. *sniff*

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  25. Great post! I loved reading all the responses. I think I’m all over the place. It just depends on the day, the moment and the circumstances.

    I love going to nationals, but I’ve learned I need my down time. I’ve already printed off my agenda and highlighted an hour each day to head back to the room for some down time.

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    • Tamara Hogan says:

      Hasn’t the discussion in comments been fascinating? I think we can safely conclude that our commenters skewed introverted. I’m in great company!!!!!

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  26. Tamara, I’m late to the party, but just had to comment. I’ve never done the Myers-Brigg thing but your description of INFP seems to fit my to a “T”. I LOVE conference, but sometimes find the sustained high energy level exhausting and overwhelming and often have to slip away by myself or with a close friend or two to decompress. I genuinely like people and I’m always interested to find out about them, their lives and their experiences, but I’ve been told I sometimes seem unapproachable.

    I need to find out more about M-B. It’ll be a great education. Thanks for an excellent, informative post. 🙂

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  27. Hi, Tammy! I am not the dancing-on-tables kind–I’m in introvert through and through. That said, I can be a little more extroverted when I need to be. I just need time to decompress afterwards!

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  28. […] 6/23/11:  Tammy talks about writers, Myers-Briggs and An Introvert’s Guide to RWA National. […]

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  29. […] Take some downtime – for most of us, the conference is a marathon, not a sprint. Don’t feel like you have to attend every single workshop. Sometimes the best use of your time is to go up to your room for an hour, decompress or take a nap, and re-energize for the evening to come. For more on this topic, here’s a blog post I wrote in 2011:  Behold My P-Ness! Writers, Myers-Briggs, and An Introvert’s Guide to RWA National. […]

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  30. Johnb955 says:

    Howdy. Simply just planned to ask a quick problem. Now i’m cccegeaedcde

    0

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